SB 10 Peer Certification VETOED – again

Governor Newsom Takes Final Action of 2019 Legislative Season
Published: 

LINK TO ALL FINAL ACTIONS

OFFICAL SB 10 VETO MESSAGE

*From the website*
Joint accomplishments include urgently addressing California’s affordability crisis by passing the Nation’s strongest statewide rent protections, expanding health care coverage and passing legislation to lower prescription drug prices

Focused on effective government by fortifying state against natural disasters and economic downturns – passing historic wildfire safety legislation and creating largest rainy day fund Ensuring justice for all Californians by passing historic clean drinking water legislation and taking on powerful institutions on behalf of everyday Californians

“Together, we have accomplished a great deal this year to help California families get ahead and made historic progress on some of the state’s most intractable challenges.”

SACRAMENTO — Governor Gavin Newsom took his final actions of the 2019 legislative season today and thanked the Legislature for their work and accomplishment on enacting 870 bills in the following statement:

“I want to take a moment to congratulate the Legislature on their work this year and to thank Senate President pro Tempore Toni Atkins and Speaker of the Assembly Anthony Rendon for their leadership. Together, we have accomplished a great deal this year – through the budget and legislation – that helps California families get ahead and tackles some of the state’s most intractable problems.

“This year, California passed the nation’s strongest renter protection package. Our state made record housing and homeless investments paired with big new tools for housing production. We moved California closer to universal health care coverage by expanding coverage, increasing Covered California subsidies for middle-income Californians and taking on rising prescription drug prices. 

“California, faced with catastrophic wildfires, invested $1 billion to prevent, mitigate and recover from wildfires, disasters and emergencies. And in July, our state enacted something that few people thought could be done – wildfire legislation that moved California closer to a safer, reliable and affordable energy future.

“Our state is doing more now than at any point in our history to help California families tackle the challenges of affordability and provide opportunity to all Californians – more than doubling tax cuts for working families, expanding paid family leave, increasing access to early childhood education, and taking on payday lenders. 

“On education, California brought disparate sides in the education community together and forged a historic agreement on changes to charter school law that was years in the making. We invested more in K-14 education than at any point in our history, and put on next year’s ballot the chance to make long-overdue investments in school infrastructure and safety. California made two years of community college tuition-free, increased financial aid for parents pursuing a college degree and kept tuition from rising in our UC and CSU systems.

“We have helped defend our state from Trump’s attacks – blocking the Administration from using state lands to open up drilling on protected federal lands. We took on the long-standing challenge of clean drinking water systems, became the first ever to require SMOG tests for semi trucks and convinced four major auto-makers to stand up for higher emission standards and oppose the Trump administration.

“California is once again striking out against injustice and leading the nation by example. We passed one of the country’s strongest police use-of-force laws, and outlawed private, for-profit prisons. California became the first state in the nation to stand up to the NCAA’s long-standing profiteering from student athletes. California took first-in-the-nation steps to strengthen our gun safety laws, protect workers and defend reproductive health care rights. We continued to make progress reforming our criminal justice system – eliminating a major mandatory minimum sentence and establishing a system to seal arrest and conviction records for low-level offenses.

“We are proving that our state is successful not despite our diversity, but because of it. California isn’t just defending our vibrant immigrant communities. We are affording all Californians – regardless of immigration status – the chance to serve their communities and give back.

“In California, we are putting in place new reforms of agencies that don’t serve the public as well as they should – pushing the DMV to join the 21st century, giving new authority to the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) to enforce wildfire safety standards, and recasting the priorities of our state’s agency that regulates oil and gas extraction.

“California did all of this while living within our means: creating the largest rainy day fund in California history, paying down pension liabilities and eliminating our state’s wall of debt.  

“In my inaugural, I spoke of the California Dream as a house – one that must be built on a strong fiscal foundation. For that reason, I am returning a number of bills to the Legislature without my signature that would significantly increase costs outside of the state’s regular budget process. 

“We have clearly achieved a great deal together, and I commend the Legislature for their hard work. I look forward to our continued partnership as we head into the new year and continue to tackle challenges of affordability and work to expand opportunity to all Californians.”

In his final action of the 2019 legislative season, the Governor today vetoed a number of bills that would significantly increase costs outside of the state’s regular budget process. In total, Governor Newsom vetoed bills this year costing $1.2 billion, increasing to $3 billion ​annually at full implementation. He also took action on a number of other bills.

Bringing Recovery Supports to Scale Technical Assistance Center Strategy (BRSS TACS) 3 part series

Bringing Recovery Supports to
Scale Technical Assistance Center Strategy (BRSS TACS)
Session 1, July 24
Session 2, July 31
Session 3, August 7

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SAMHSA’s Bringing Recovery Supports to Scale Technical Assistance Center Strategy (BRSS TACS) invites you to join a three-part virtual learning series focusing on recovery supports for people considering or using medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for opioid use disorder (OUD) or co-occurring disorders.

MAT leads to better treatment outcomes than behavioral therapies alone. There is strong evidence that combining MAT with recovery support services improves outcomes for people with OUD. Peer support workers are uniquely positioned to provide recovery support services. They offer lived experience of recovery from substance use disorders, mental health conditions, or both, and have specialized training to support people seeking recovery.

  • Session one of the Living Proof series will examine the neurobiology of OUD and share information about three medications commonly used to treat this disorder. Presenters will highlight important considerations for people with co-occurring disorders who are considering using MAT or currently using this treatment approach.
  • Session two will examine peer-delivered recovery supports for people using MAT.
  • Session three will explore the role of peer support workers in engaging and supporting people with OUD who are considering the use of MAT.

REGISTER NOW
You may register for individual sessions or the series

In each session, presenters will address common misperceptions about MAT; provide current, accurate information; and recommend ways to learn more and educate others about OUD, co-occurring disorders, and MAT.

The presenters will share information and strategies that strengthen peers’ ability to provide:

  • peer recovery supports for people considering MAT, including identifying goals, determining individual preferences, and using an informed decision-making process;
  • peer recovery supports for people with OUD who currently use MAT; and
  • appropriate strategies to apply important considerations for people with co-occurring disorders who are considering using MAT.

Join us for these free, interactive virtual events moderated by Steven Samra, BRSS TACS Deputy Director, and Devin Reaves, Co-Founder and Executive Director, Pennsylvania Harm Reduction Coalition.

REGISTER NOW
You may register for individual sessions or the series

Session 1, July 24: Neurobiology of OUD and Medications for OUD: Implications for Co-occurring Disorders”

Presenters:
Ayana Jordan, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor at Yale and an attending physician at Connecticut Mental Health Center
David Marcovitz, MD, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Vanderbilt University

Session 2, July 31: Delivering Recovery Supports to People with OUD Who Are Participating in MAT”

Presenters:
Brooke Feldman, President, Sparking Solutions LLC
Carlos Hardy, MHS, Founder and Executive Director, Maryland Recovery Organization Connecting Communities
Amelia Murphy, Peer Recovery Coach Educator and Medication-Assisted Recovery Support (MARS) Trainer
Rollin Oden, MD, MPH, Director, CCH-WAGEES Program, Colorado Coalition for the Homeless

Session 3, August 7: Delivering Recovery Supports to People with OUD Who Are Considering MAT”

Presenters:
Sharon LeGore, Founder and President, MOMSTELL
David Marcovitz, MD, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Vanderbilt University
Sara Schade, Executive Director, Unlimited Alternatives

REGISTER NOW

You may register for individual sessions or the series.
Registration will close 60 minutes before the event start time.

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SB10 Peer Certification Assembly Health Committee 1:30 room 4202

July 2 at 1:30 pm
1315 10th St
Room 4202
Sacramento, CA 95814

 

THIRD READING HISTORY
SENATE RULES COMMITTEE:
Office of Senate Floor Analyses (916) 651-1520
Fax: (916) 327-4478

Bill No: SB 10
Author: Beall (D), et al.
Amended: 5/17/19
Vote: 21

SENATE HEALTH COMMITTEE: 9-0, 3/27/19 AYES: Pan, Stone, Durazo, Grove, Hurtado, Leyva, Mitchell, Monning, Rubio

SENATE APPROPRIATIONS COMMITTEE: 6-0, 5/16/19 AYES: Portantino, Bates, Bradford, Hill, Jones, Wieckowski

SUBJECT: Mental health services: peer support specialist certification

SOURCE: Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors  ~ Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission ~ Steinberg Institute

Message from Senator Beall’s Office

Dear supporters,

Thank you so much for your patience- we have a new Assembly Health committee date for SB 10- Tuesday July 2 at 1:30 pm in room 4202. We will be up first. Please come and show your support- this will be our last policy committee hearing and we want it to be big!

Thank you to all who have sent letters!

CAMHPRO Seeks Talented, Diverse Peers for Part-Time Positions

#1 Qualification: To be a person with personal lived experience of behavioral health (mental health &/or substance use/abuse) challenges in recovery

  • The positions are very part-time, at 5 hours per week, and are independent contractor positions, paying $20/hour.
  • Cover letter and resumes accepted by Executive Director, Sally Zinman, at sallyzinman@gmail.com until May 30, 2019 at 11:59 pm.
  • Positions will begin no later than the end of June, 2019.
If you are interested in applying, please review the Job Descriptions and Qualification by clicking on the Job Title below

Outreach Administrative Apprentice 
The Outreach Administrative Apprentice is primarily responsible for assisting with outreach to engage diverse groups and individuals in Peer Action League activities, and general administrative support.

Cultural Diversity Coordinator
The Cultural Diversity Coordinator is primarily responsible for managing activities of CAMHPRO’s Peer Action League (PAL) Cultural Racial Ethnic Equity Committee and administrative support to PAL

Public Policy Coordinator

The Public Policy Coordinator is primarily responsible for managing activities of CAMHPRO’s Peer Action League (PAL) Public Policy Committee and administrative support to PAL.

Movement and Your Mental Health – PEERS

Movement and Your Mental Health
by Leah Harris

Our physical and mental health are deeply intertwined. The state of our mind can affect the health of our bodies. Physical activity has been widely correlated with a reduction in depression and anxiety, which in turn can increase physical well-being, which further improves mental health, and so on. Movement also offers an accessible alternative to persons who cannot afford or access traditional psychotherapy, or who have not found such therapies to be beneficial. And recently, researchers at Yale and Oxford published a study indicating that exercise may be more important to our mental health than economic status!

Images from the We Move for Health, May 3rd, 2019 at San Leandro Marina

This month, we’re taking a deeper look at the relationship between physical activity and our mental health. What kinds of physical activity are best — not just for our bodies, but for our minds? What is the “sweet spot” amount of movement that leads to the greatest mental health benefits? And what are alternative options for persons who cannot perform physical activity due to illness or disability?

A 2018 study in The Lancet found that team sports seemed to offer the greatest overall mental health benefits. The researchers analyzed Centers for Disease Control and Prevention survey data from 1.2 million adults and found — across age, gender, education status and income — people who exercised had fewer “bad mental health days” than those who didn’t. And people who played team sports reported the fewest. The study’s authors hypothesized that team sports may be so beneficial to mental health because they incorporate the added benefit of community and social support. This is especially relevant for people living with depression or other mental health conditions where isolation is common. A related benefit of team sports is built-in accountability. While you can blow off a solo walk in nature, your team is depending on you to win the game. If team sports aren’t for you, research has demonstrated the self-esteem boosting benefits of activities using synchronized group movements, such as Qi Gong or Tai Chi.

While we know that a lack of physical activity can influence the course of our mental health, more movement does not necessarily mean more benefit. A 2018 study published in The Lancet found that those who exercised more than 90 minutes a day, for most days of the month, reported worse mental health than those who moved less. Generally, researchers recommend a rule of thumb of 30-60 minutes a day, 3-5 times a week for optimum well-being.

When discussing the relationship between physical activity and mental health, it’s important to provide accessible alternatives to people with limited mobility due to disability, illness, or aging. A practice with similar physical and mental health benefits to sustained physical activity is simply spending time in nature. Just 30-40 minutes spent sitting quietly or wandering slowly in a green space, breathing mindfully, can improve mood and even immune function, according to research conducted on the Japanese practice of shinrin-yoku or “forest bathing.

Here’s to moving this spring for our mental health.

To learn more, check out these resources!

            PEERS FACEBOOK PAGE                                                 PEERS WEBSITE

Become a Peer Action League Member (PALM)

Do you want to be part of something bigger than yourself?
Become a member of Peer Action League (PAL)

1) Join our Intro to PAL webinar
2) Apply online or by PDF

Register for one of the INTRO TO PAL Webinars:

Two Webinar Dates

Tuesday May 14
12 noon – 1 p.m.

Thursday June 6
12 noon – 1 p.m.

To become a PALM you must agree to abide by
CHAMPRO’s Public Policy Principles

TO APPLY using SurveyMonkey or by downloading the PDF

PALM APPLICATION FOR INDIVIDUAL PEERS

SurveyMonkey Link: Individual Application

PDF Download Individual Peer Application

PALM APPLICATION FOR PEER RUN PROGRAM/AGENCY

Peer Action League Activities

  • Webinars to Optimize Peer Run Agency/Program Infrastructure & Sustainability-Quarterly.
  • Regional Policy Forums:
    • 4 per year
    • culminating with a statewide Conference in Year 3.
  • Advocacy webinar series for effective peer stakeholder voices.
  • Continued monthly peer webinars
    • Peer Best Practices
    • Standardization
    • Peer Support 4 Peer Specialists (PS4PS)
  • Empower peers throughout the State to serve on key State-level policy bodies.
  • 3 PAL Action Committees meet online
    • Peer Workforce
    • Cultural Racial & Ethnic Equity
    • Public Policy
  • PAL Members (PALMs) quarterly meetings online to share progress and outcomes from Action Committees, and to plan collective next steps.

Please pass this on to colleagues, friends and people you serve!

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ABCs of Advocacy Onsite Workshop and Webinars Materials Marin County

Hello Marin County Attendees or Registrants of “CAMHPRO’s Delivering theABC’s of Advocacy”,
It was a wonderful honor to come to, and enjoy your BEAUTIFUL county and meet all of you!
Please find the recordings for Web A, Web B and Web C below.
Here are also all resources provided on the webinars and in the onsite workshop. Just click on the title:
I hope to ‘see’ you all at other webinars and events soon!
Thank you,
Karin



Webinar A: Advocacy Basics
What is covered:
  • What is advocacy, who are stakeholders and why advocate.
  • Consumer roots of the law, the Mental Health Service Act (MHSA) and regulations for Stakeholder involvement in planning mental health services.
  • A bird’s eye view of who the County decision-makers are and how you can participate.
  • Access to basic terms and acronyms used in Behavioral Health and where you can go to find county contacts.



Webinar B: Best Community Planning Practices
What is covered:
  • Types of County meetings and various stakeholder participation or roles
  • Meeting mechanics, culture and etiquette
  • MHSA stakeholder community planning best principles & practices applied to different stakeholder roles.
  • What to look for in county budgets and plans.
  • More resources to become a meaningful stakeholder



Webinar C: Community Planning; How to Work It
·
What is covered:
  • More on applying the MHSA community planning best principles & practices
  • How you compose and give public comment.
  • How you get on decision-making boards/councils.
  • Next steps to being a meaningful stakeholder.
Funded by the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)