CAMHPRO Seeks Talented, Diverse Peers for Part-Time Positions

#1 Qualification: To be a person with personal lived experience of behavioral health (mental health &/or substance use/abuse) challenges in recovery

  • The positions are very part-time, at 5 hours per week, and are independent contractor positions, paying $20/hour.
  • Cover letter and resumes accepted by Executive Director, Sally Zinman, at sallyzinman@gmail.com until May 30, 2019 at 11:59 pm.
  • Positions will begin no later than the end of June, 2019.
If you are interested in applying, please review the Job Descriptions and Qualification by clicking on the Job Title below

Outreach Administrative Apprentice 
The Outreach Administrative Apprentice is primarily responsible for assisting with outreach to engage diverse groups and individuals in Peer Action League activities, and general administrative support.

Cultural Diversity Coordinator
The Cultural Diversity Coordinator is primarily responsible for managing activities of CAMHPRO’s Peer Action League (PAL) Cultural Racial Ethnic Equity Committee and administrative support to PAL

Public Policy Coordinator

The Public Policy Coordinator is primarily responsible for managing activities of CAMHPRO’s Peer Action League (PAL) Public Policy Committee and administrative support to PAL.

Movement and Your Mental Health – PEERS

Movement and Your Mental Health
by Leah Harris

Our physical and mental health are deeply intertwined. The state of our mind can affect the health of our bodies. Physical activity has been widely correlated with a reduction in depression and anxiety, which in turn can increase physical well-being, which further improves mental health, and so on. Movement also offers an accessible alternative to persons who cannot afford or access traditional psychotherapy, or who have not found such therapies to be beneficial. And recently, researchers at Yale and Oxford published a study indicating that exercise may be more important to our mental health than economic status!

Images from the We Move for Health, May 3rd, 2019 at San Leandro Marina

This month, we’re taking a deeper look at the relationship between physical activity and our mental health. What kinds of physical activity are best — not just for our bodies, but for our minds? What is the “sweet spot” amount of movement that leads to the greatest mental health benefits? And what are alternative options for persons who cannot perform physical activity due to illness or disability?

A 2018 study in The Lancet found that team sports seemed to offer the greatest overall mental health benefits. The researchers analyzed Centers for Disease Control and Prevention survey data from 1.2 million adults and found — across age, gender, education status and income — people who exercised had fewer “bad mental health days” than those who didn’t. And people who played team sports reported the fewest. The study’s authors hypothesized that team sports may be so beneficial to mental health because they incorporate the added benefit of community and social support. This is especially relevant for people living with depression or other mental health conditions where isolation is common. A related benefit of team sports is built-in accountability. While you can blow off a solo walk in nature, your team is depending on you to win the game. If team sports aren’t for you, research has demonstrated the self-esteem boosting benefits of activities using synchronized group movements, such as Qi Gong or Tai Chi.

While we know that a lack of physical activity can influence the course of our mental health, more movement does not necessarily mean more benefit. A 2018 study published in The Lancet found that those who exercised more than 90 minutes a day, for most days of the month, reported worse mental health than those who moved less. Generally, researchers recommend a rule of thumb of 30-60 minutes a day, 3-5 times a week for optimum well-being.

When discussing the relationship between physical activity and mental health, it’s important to provide accessible alternatives to people with limited mobility due to disability, illness, or aging. A practice with similar physical and mental health benefits to sustained physical activity is simply spending time in nature. Just 30-40 minutes spent sitting quietly or wandering slowly in a green space, breathing mindfully, can improve mood and even immune function, according to research conducted on the Japanese practice of shinrin-yoku or “forest bathing.

Here’s to moving this spring for our mental health.

To learn more, check out these resources!

            PEERS FACEBOOK PAGE                                                 PEERS WEBSITE

Become a Peer Action League Member (PALM)

Do you want to be part of something bigger than yourself?
Become a member of Peer Action League (PAL)

1) Join our Intro to PAL webinar
2) Apply online or by PDF

Register for one of the INTRO TO PAL Webinars:

Two Webinar Dates

Tuesday May 14
12 noon – 1 p.m.

Thursday June 6
12 noon – 1 p.m.

To become a PALM you must agree to abide by
CHAMPRO’s Public Policy Principles

TO APPLY using SurveyMonkey or by downloading the PDF

PALM APPLICATION FOR INDIVIDUAL PEERS

SurveyMonkey Link: Individual Application

PDF Download Individual Peer Application

PALM APPLICATION FOR PEER RUN PROGRAM/AGENCY

Peer Action League Activities

  • Webinars to Optimize Peer Run Agency/Program Infrastructure & Sustainability-Quarterly.
  • Regional Policy Forums:
    • 4 per year
    • culminating with a statewide Conference in Year 3.
  • Advocacy webinar series for effective peer stakeholder voices.
  • Continued monthly peer webinars
    • Peer Best Practices
    • Standardization
    • Peer Support 4 Peer Specialists (PS4PS)
  • Empower peers throughout the State to serve on key State-level policy bodies.
  • 3 PAL Action Committees meet online
    • Peer Workforce
    • Cultural Racial & Ethnic Equity
    • Public Policy
  • PAL Members (PALMs) quarterly meetings online to share progress and outcomes from Action Committees, and to plan collective next steps.

Please pass this on to colleagues, friends and people you serve!

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ABCs of Advocacy Onsite Workshop and Webinars Materials Marin County

Hello Marin County Attendees or Registrants of “CAMHPRO’s Delivering theABC’s of Advocacy”,
It was a wonderful honor to come to, and enjoy your BEAUTIFUL county and meet all of you!
Please find the recordings for Web A, Web B and Web C below.
Here are also all resources provided on the webinars and in the onsite workshop. Just click on the title:
I hope to ‘see’ you all at other webinars and events soon!
Thank you,
Karin



Webinar A: Advocacy Basics
What is covered:
  • What is advocacy, who are stakeholders and why advocate.
  • Consumer roots of the law, the Mental Health Service Act (MHSA) and regulations for Stakeholder involvement in planning mental health services.
  • A bird’s eye view of who the County decision-makers are and how you can participate.
  • Access to basic terms and acronyms used in Behavioral Health and where you can go to find county contacts.



Webinar B: Best Community Planning Practices
What is covered:
  • Types of County meetings and various stakeholder participation or roles
  • Meeting mechanics, culture and etiquette
  • MHSA stakeholder community planning best principles & practices applied to different stakeholder roles.
  • What to look for in county budgets and plans.
  • More resources to become a meaningful stakeholder



Webinar C: Community Planning; How to Work It
·
What is covered:
  • More on applying the MHSA community planning best principles & practices
  • How you compose and give public comment.
  • How you get on decision-making boards/councils.
  • Next steps to being a meaningful stakeholder.
Funded by the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

This Thurs. 4/11 Peer Support 4 Peer Supporters

Peer Support 4 Peer Supporters
CAMHPRO WEBINAR
This Thurs. 4/11
12 noon
Register Here

Co-facilitator:
  • Denise Walker, Senior Peer Support Specialist
  • Riverside University Health System See Bio
What’s the Focus?
  • Choose project Vision from January participant feedback
  • Review CA Stakeholder, SAMHSA, other Peer Values
  • Choose/Adopt Peer Values

SEE WWT Stakeholder-vetted Values & Ethics
SEE SAMHSA Core Competencies for Peer Workers in Behavioral Health Services
SEE Values and Ethics Copeland Center




About CAMHPRO’s Monthly Peer Webinars:
CAMHPRO has a quarterly rotation of a Spotlight with a Guest Presenter of Model Peer Support Practices, Peer Support 4 Peer Supporters (PS4PS) with a Guest Co-Facilitator, and Updates on CA Peer Specialist Standardization. THANKS TO THE CO-FACILITATOR VOLUNTEERS!
Schedule:
May, Aug, Nov, Feb:
Peer Model Spotlight—Next May 9
—Topic: Changing Organizational Culture
—Co-facilitator Kristen Mungcal, Program Manager, San Bernardino County
June, Sep, Dec, Mar:
State Peer Standardization–Next June 13
—Co-facilitator: Catherine Clay, VP of Client Advisory, Los Angeles Region
July, Oct, Jan, April:
Peer Support 4 Peer Supporters (PS4PS)–Next July 11
—Co-facilitator: Brian K. Hollander, Program Manager, Independent Living Resource Center, Inc., Santa Barbara
You only need to register once for this monthly webinar with your correct email. If you have already registered you will receive a reminder email each month with your unique link to join.
REGISTER HERE

SB 10 will be heard at the Appropriations Committee on Monday April 8, 2019

SB 10 will be heard at the Appropriations Committee

Monday April 8, 2019.

ANTHONY PORTANTINO, Chair

10 a.m. – John L. Burton Hearing Room (4203) at Capitol

Dear Senator Portantino,
The Steinberg Institute is a leading nonprofit public policy institute that supports and encourages effective and comprehensive mental health policymaking. We are the proud sponsors of SB 10 (Beall) that would call upon the state to standardize high-quality peer and family support services. READ ENTIRE LETTER

Sammy Caiola / Capital Public Radio

Eric Bailey now works for Sacramento’s chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, using his lived experience with bipolar disorder to help connect people suffering from mental health issues to the care they need.

California lawmakers are considering a bill that could help build a workforce of people living with mental illness to help guide others in need of services toward care.

When Eric Bailey landed in a San Diego hospital after a mental health crisis in 2013, he says he was at the end of his rope.

“At the moment of being ready to discharge, I had zero idea what I was doing,” he said. “I had no vehicle there at the time, my wife was leaving me, I’d lost my job, I was losing my apartment as well.”

Bailey didn’t know where to go. Then a stranger approached him and told him he’d been in that same psychiatric ward, and that he could help. READ FULL ARTICLE

SB 10 Peer Certification Capitol Visit 3/27

Following emotional testimony from supporters
The Senate Health Committee Wednesday
Unanimously passed SB 10 (Senator Jim Beall)

which would establish a certification process for peer providers of mental health and substance abuse services. Peers are people who draw on experiences with mental illness and/or substance use disorder and recovery, bolstered by specialized training, to deliver valuable support services in a treatment setting.

Witnesses Wednesday included Khatera Tamplen, a peer herself who is consumer empowerment manager at Alameda County Behavioral Health Care Services and chair of the state Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission, which co-sponsored the bill along with the Steinberg Institute. Also speaking was Keris Jän Myrick, Discipline Chief for Peer Services for the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, who was featured in a New York Times article for being a successful executive with a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Myrick was accompanied by LA County Director of Mental Health Jon Sherin, who said getting a certification process was his top priority.

Across California, peer providers are already used in many settings. However, there is no statewide standard of practice, consistent curriculum, training standards, supervision standards, or certification protocol in California, which now one of only two states (the other is South Dakota) that does not have peer certification. Yet peer support programs have emerged nationwide as an evidence-based practice with proven benefits to both peers and the clients they assist, including reduced hospitalizations, alleviation of depression and enhanced self-advocacy.

A peer support program also creates a career ladder so that consumers and family members working in mental health care have the opportunity to fully contribute, translating their experience into meaningful employment.