California Warmlines

warm line is an alternative to a crisis line that is run by “peers,”
generally those who have had their own experiences of trauma
that they are willing to speak of and acknowledge

MHA-SF  The Peer-Run Warm Line (1-855-845-7415) is a non-emergency resource for anyone in the Bay Area seeking emotional support. We provide assistance via phone and web chat on a nondiscriminatory basis to anyone in need Or Chat via IM
Hours:  Sunday 7am – 9pm ~ Monday – Friday 7am – 11pm ~ Saturday 7am – 3pm

 

Project Return Peer Support Network Peer-Run Warmline
Los Angeles County Residents
Hours Monday – Friday 5pm-10pm, Saturday 11am-4pm, Sunday Closed
(888) 448-9777 English and by text
(888) 448-4055 Spanish and by text

 

The OC Warmline- NAMI Orange County
(714) 991-6412
Hours: Monday-Friday 9am-3am ~ Saturday & Sunday 10am to 3am
Languages: English, Spanish, Vietnamese and Farsi with Interpreter Services available

 

Consumer to Consumer – The Meeting Place Clubhouse, Inc.
for San Diego residents only
800 920-WARM (9276) and (619) 295-1055
Hours: 7 days a week 4:00 P.M. to 11:00 P.M., except Holidays
Northern Valley Peer Run Talk Line

 

Butte County, California
A confidential non-crisis peer support network. You are not alone, we are here to listen.
855-582-5554
Hours 7days/week 365 days/year 4:30 pm-9:30 pm

 

San Joaquin County BH Services Consumer Support Warm-Line
For local San Joaquin County residents only
(209) 468-8686
Operating 24/7 since July of 2008

 

Warmline Connection (NAMI Sonoma)
866-960-6264
Hours: Mon-Fri 9am – 5pm

 

PDF of information

SB 10 will be heard at the Appropriations Committee on Monday April 8, 2019

SB 10 will be heard at the Appropriations Committee

Monday April 8, 2019.

ANTHONY PORTANTINO, Chair

10 a.m. – John L. Burton Hearing Room (4203) at Capitol

Dear Senator Portantino,
The Steinberg Institute is a leading nonprofit public policy institute that supports and encourages effective and comprehensive mental health policymaking. We are the proud sponsors of SB 10 (Beall) that would call upon the state to standardize high-quality peer and family support services. READ ENTIRE LETTER

Sammy Caiola / Capital Public Radio

Eric Bailey now works for Sacramento’s chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, using his lived experience with bipolar disorder to help connect people suffering from mental health issues to the care they need.

California lawmakers are considering a bill that could help build a workforce of people living with mental illness to help guide others in need of services toward care.

When Eric Bailey landed in a San Diego hospital after a mental health crisis in 2013, he says he was at the end of his rope.

“At the moment of being ready to discharge, I had zero idea what I was doing,” he said. “I had no vehicle there at the time, my wife was leaving me, I’d lost my job, I was losing my apartment as well.”

Bailey didn’t know where to go. Then a stranger approached him and told him he’d been in that same psychiatric ward, and that he could help. READ FULL ARTICLE