SB10 Peer Certification Passes on Assembly Floor 67-0

(From Steinberg Facebook Post): SB 10 (Beall), which would establish a statewide peer support specialist certification program, received bipartisan support with a 79-0 vote and passed off the Assembly Floor today. The Steinberg Institute is a proud co-sponsor along with the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health and the Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission. Thank you to Asm Waldron and Senator Beall for your leadership on this important issue.

 



Bringing Recovery Supports to Scale Technical Assistance Center Strategy (BRSS TACS) 3 part series

Bringing Recovery Supports to
Scale Technical Assistance Center Strategy (BRSS TACS)
Session 1, July 24
Session 2, July 31
Session 3, August 7

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SAMHSA’s Bringing Recovery Supports to Scale Technical Assistance Center Strategy (BRSS TACS) invites you to join a three-part virtual learning series focusing on recovery supports for people considering or using medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for opioid use disorder (OUD) or co-occurring disorders.

MAT leads to better treatment outcomes than behavioral therapies alone. There is strong evidence that combining MAT with recovery support services improves outcomes for people with OUD. Peer support workers are uniquely positioned to provide recovery support services. They offer lived experience of recovery from substance use disorders, mental health conditions, or both, and have specialized training to support people seeking recovery.

  • Session one of the Living Proof series will examine the neurobiology of OUD and share information about three medications commonly used to treat this disorder. Presenters will highlight important considerations for people with co-occurring disorders who are considering using MAT or currently using this treatment approach.
  • Session two will examine peer-delivered recovery supports for people using MAT.
  • Session three will explore the role of peer support workers in engaging and supporting people with OUD who are considering the use of MAT.

REGISTER NOW
You may register for individual sessions or the series

In each session, presenters will address common misperceptions about MAT; provide current, accurate information; and recommend ways to learn more and educate others about OUD, co-occurring disorders, and MAT.

The presenters will share information and strategies that strengthen peers’ ability to provide:

  • peer recovery supports for people considering MAT, including identifying goals, determining individual preferences, and using an informed decision-making process;
  • peer recovery supports for people with OUD who currently use MAT; and
  • appropriate strategies to apply important considerations for people with co-occurring disorders who are considering using MAT.

Join us for these free, interactive virtual events moderated by Steven Samra, BRSS TACS Deputy Director, and Devin Reaves, Co-Founder and Executive Director, Pennsylvania Harm Reduction Coalition.

REGISTER NOW
You may register for individual sessions or the series

Session 1, July 24: Neurobiology of OUD and Medications for OUD: Implications for Co-occurring Disorders”

Presenters:
Ayana Jordan, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor at Yale and an attending physician at Connecticut Mental Health Center
David Marcovitz, MD, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Vanderbilt University

Session 2, July 31: Delivering Recovery Supports to People with OUD Who Are Participating in MAT”

Presenters:
Brooke Feldman, President, Sparking Solutions LLC
Carlos Hardy, MHS, Founder and Executive Director, Maryland Recovery Organization Connecting Communities
Amelia Murphy, Peer Recovery Coach Educator and Medication-Assisted Recovery Support (MARS) Trainer
Rollin Oden, MD, MPH, Director, CCH-WAGEES Program, Colorado Coalition for the Homeless

Session 3, August 7: Delivering Recovery Supports to People with OUD Who Are Considering MAT”

Presenters:
Sharon LeGore, Founder and President, MOMSTELL
David Marcovitz, MD, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Vanderbilt University
Sara Schade, Executive Director, Unlimited Alternatives

REGISTER NOW

You may register for individual sessions or the series.
Registration will close 60 minutes before the event start time.

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CAMHPRO Seeks Talented, Diverse Peers for Part-Time Positions

#1 Qualification: To be a person with personal lived experience of behavioral health (mental health &/or substance use/abuse) challenges in recovery

  • The positions are very part-time, at 5 hours per week, and are independent contractor positions, paying $20/hour.
  • Cover letter and resumes accepted by Executive Director, Sally Zinman, at sallyzinman@gmail.com until May 30, 2019 at 11:59 pm.
  • Positions will begin no later than the end of June, 2019.
If you are interested in applying, please review the Job Descriptions and Qualification by clicking on the Job Title below

Outreach Administrative Apprentice 
The Outreach Administrative Apprentice is primarily responsible for assisting with outreach to engage diverse groups and individuals in Peer Action League activities, and general administrative support.

Cultural Diversity Coordinator
The Cultural Diversity Coordinator is primarily responsible for managing activities of CAMHPRO’s Peer Action League (PAL) Cultural Racial Ethnic Equity Committee and administrative support to PAL

Public Policy Coordinator

The Public Policy Coordinator is primarily responsible for managing activities of CAMHPRO’s Peer Action League (PAL) Public Policy Committee and administrative support to PAL.

BRSS TACS April 2019 Monthly Update

Welcome to the April 2019 Monthly Update from SAMHSA’s Bringing Recovery Supports to Scale Technical Assistance Center Strategy (BRSS TACS). BRSS TACS Monthly Updates highlight upcoming events and resources that promote recovery.
In This Issue:
  • Recovery LIVE! Virtual Event: “Increasing Access to Treatment and Recovery Supports for People with Disabilities”– April 25, 2019
  • Ask the Expert
  • Funding Opportunity from the Health Resources & Services Administration
  • Now Available: Two New Resources from the National Alliance for Recovery Residences
  • Patient Scholarship Opportunity: AcademyHealth Annual Research Meeting
  • Two-part Webinar: “De-escalating the Opioid Crisis: An Overview of Promising Prevention Strategies” – April 23–24, 2019
  • Just Released: After a School Tragedy…Readiness, Response, Recovery, & Resources
  • Webinar: “Medication-Assisted Treatment in the Health Care for the Homeless Community: Strategies for Expanding Services” – May 1, 2019
  • Recommended Recovery Resources
  • Request Technical Assistance



Ask the Expert

Nev Jones, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Mental Health Law & Policy at the University of South Florida, shares ways to support college students with mental health issues.
Question: 
What can we do to improve college access and success for young people with mental health issues?
Answer
Young people with mental health issues face numerous barriers in completing a college education. There are two key strategies for improving access: better use of academic accommodations and advocacy for improved supports on campus.

In theory, academic accommodations—disability-based administrative policy and course modifications—are one of the most powerful tools we have for leveling the playing field for students with disabilities. Unfortunately, many campus disability offices lack expertise in psychiatric disabilities and may hand out lists of stock accommodations that would do little to address challenges specific to mental health. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that accommodations be carefully tailored to meet individual needs. Greater awareness of the types of accommodations for mental health conditions is critical. The resources listed below can help students and instructors develop accommodation plans that are much more likely to address complex mental health needs.

While we regularly hear about students placed on mandated leaves of absence, some campuses have taken a much more compassionate approach. For example, some campuses provide wraparound case management designed to help students connect the dots across otherwise siloed university divisions. At other universities, administrators have developed dedicated programs aimed at providing proactive supports to students with significant mental health challenges. Ideally, such supports would be available on every campus. Students, families, and providers can play a major role in expanding such programs by advocating for local funding and implementation.

To learn more, join us at Recovery LIVE!: “Increasing Access to Treatment and Recovery Supports for People with Disabilities” on April 25, 2019, and check out the following resources:

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Become a Peer Action League Member (PALM)

Do you want to be part of something bigger than yourself?
Become a member of Peer Action League (PAL)

1) Join our Intro to PAL webinar
2) Apply online or by PDF

Register for one of the INTRO TO PAL Webinars:

Two Webinar Dates

Tuesday May 14
12 noon – 1 p.m.

Thursday June 6
12 noon – 1 p.m.

To become a PALM you must agree to abide by
CHAMPRO’s Public Policy Principles

TO APPLY using SurveyMonkey or by downloading the PDF

PALM APPLICATION FOR INDIVIDUAL PEERS

SurveyMonkey Link: Individual Application

PDF Download Individual Peer Application

PALM APPLICATION FOR PEER RUN PROGRAM/AGENCY

Peer Action League Activities

  • Webinars to Optimize Peer Run Agency/Program Infrastructure & Sustainability-Quarterly.
  • Regional Policy Forums:
    • 4 per year
    • culminating with a statewide Conference in Year 3.
  • Advocacy webinar series for effective peer stakeholder voices.
  • Continued monthly peer webinars
    • Peer Best Practices
    • Standardization
    • Peer Support 4 Peer Specialists (PS4PS)
  • Empower peers throughout the State to serve on key State-level policy bodies.
  • 3 PAL Action Committees meet online
    • Peer Workforce
    • Cultural Racial & Ethnic Equity
    • Public Policy
  • PAL Members (PALMs) quarterly meetings online to share progress and outcomes from Action Committees, and to plan collective next steps.

Please pass this on to colleagues, friends and people you serve!

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Resilience Inc. – Rise and Shine News

At Resilience, Inc. we are discovering the next steps toward transformation on the evolutionary ladder of recovery and wellness. The skills and knowledge gained over the past 20 years have allowed the field to make dramatic shifts in the approaches taken to facilitate recovery from emotional distress, addiction and hard times.

The challenge now is to create a new pathway toward resilient community living.  By building on the “Aha!” moment of recovery we can create a lifetime of self-sustaining and resilient living. This is a challenge, but based on the faith it took to believe in the miracle of recovery, we trust the human spirit to be resilient.

Rise and Shine with Us!

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Message From Lori Ashcraft: Newsletter

Hello Friends,

We are certainly getting our share of April showers here in Northern California. Lots of us are tired of the rain, but not me. I love it. But I sympathize with those who complain anyway. Why not? We can’t change it anyway.

Speaking of changing things, last night I was thinking about the phrase that began to change the way we look at case management. “I’m not a case and I don’t want to be managed.” This simple phrase became the battle cry for all those on case management who wanted to be treated differently. They wanted to have a say in their treatment planning. They wanted to be treated with respect. I first heard this phrase in the early 80’s as it fell from the lips of Jay Mahler, a highly respected peer pioneer and advocate in California. Jay played a significant role in bringing into being what’s known as “the millionaire tax” that has enhanced the funding of recovery and peer programs in California.

Many professionals welcomed this shift from “managing” to “inspiring” since they knew managing wasn’t working. Trying to manage and control people did not promote recovery and healing.

I had already learned this from my early work as a care manger and I’ve shared some of those stories with you. I have another one to share this time that was the experience that finally drove this home for me. This one, Debbie’s story, is about a teenager. I think teenagers get listened to less than anyone, and I was no exception when it came to Debbie. I thought I knew what was best for her. In fact, I thought I knew more about everything than she did. Boy, was I off on the wrong foot! Take a look for yourself by going to our website by clicking on this tab Resources. Then, scroll to the bottom of the webpage and click on “Debbie’s Story” (in orange).

I’d like to think things have changed a lot since then, but I still hear awful stories about how Case Management is being carried out in some places. The addition of peers to Case Management Teams has the potential of making significant positive changes if they are given the latitude to influence the process.

Until May flowers,

Lori
XOXOXO

ABCs of Advocacy Onsite Workshop and Webinars Materials Marin County

Hello Marin County Attendees or Registrants of “CAMHPRO’s Delivering theABC’s of Advocacy”,
It was a wonderful honor to come to, and enjoy your BEAUTIFUL county and meet all of you!
Please find the recordings for Web A, Web B and Web C below.
Here are also all resources provided on the webinars and in the onsite workshop. Just click on the title:
I hope to ‘see’ you all at other webinars and events soon!
Thank you,
Karin



Webinar A: Advocacy Basics
What is covered:
  • What is advocacy, who are stakeholders and why advocate.
  • Consumer roots of the law, the Mental Health Service Act (MHSA) and regulations for Stakeholder involvement in planning mental health services.
  • A bird’s eye view of who the County decision-makers are and how you can participate.
  • Access to basic terms and acronyms used in Behavioral Health and where you can go to find county contacts.



Webinar B: Best Community Planning Practices
What is covered:
  • Types of County meetings and various stakeholder participation or roles
  • Meeting mechanics, culture and etiquette
  • MHSA stakeholder community planning best principles & practices applied to different stakeholder roles.
  • What to look for in county budgets and plans.
  • More resources to become a meaningful stakeholder



Webinar C: Community Planning; How to Work It
·
What is covered:
  • More on applying the MHSA community planning best principles & practices
  • How you compose and give public comment.
  • How you get on decision-making boards/councils.
  • Next steps to being a meaningful stakeholder.
Funded by the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)