#CAPeerRespites, Peer2Peer Support

Collaborating with Pool of Consumer Champions (POCC) and Mental Health Services Oversight & Accountability Commission (MHSOAC), we would like to send a very special thank you for everyone who joined us in celebrating Peer2Peer Support

#CAPeerRespites

Peer Respites: Expanding Peer2Peer Support
May 15, 2019

Peer2Peer Program of the day
Second Story Peer Respite Home (Santa Cruz County)
Share! Recovery House (Los Angeles County)
Blackbird House (Santa Clara County)
Sally’s Place (Alameda County)

Photos of the day:

 

Ideas from Breakout Groups

Peer Respites:
Expanding Peer2Peer Support


During the event 5/15/19, participates were asked how we could continue to network and grow peer respites throughout California. The responses below, categorized by themes, were the outcomes of the ongoing discussions throughout the day. This is the community voice.

To Build Support for Peer Respites: Advocacy

  • Educate the community, politicians, churches, schools, community service centers and other service providers, etc.
  • Provide exceptional services at existing respites, will lead to word of mouth
  • Create a tax incentive (or other financial incentive) to rent or sell a house for peer respite
  • Good data to communicate successes
  • Tax on Big Pharma to fund peer respite
  • Social media campaign using #CAPeerRespites
  • Connecting with faith-based organizations that have supportive mindset about mental health treatment/care/peer support
  • Utilize connections like news outlets to do local public interest stories spotlighting local peer respites (human kindness, compassion)
  • Create a “Peer Respite Day” during mental health month
  • Approach legislators to create bills
  • Determining messages and resources
  • Multimedia, TV, social media, radio, advertisements

Building a Network to Expand & Strengthen Peer Respite

  • Create a long-term strategic plan with existing peer respites to create a movement for peer respites in all counties
  • Peer respite working group to plan for Medi-Cal billing if SB 10 passes
  • Bimonthly meetings among existing peer respites for collaboration, sharing, learning, advising
  • Identify a “welcomer,” a point of contact to welcome others (new peer respites?)
  • Visit other peer sites
  • Build fellowship within peer community (ex: cookout)
  • Knowing people who will donate supplies or a house
  • Understanding and leveraging funding: seeking donations from corporations
  • Create info sheet about using MHSA money to fund peer respites
  • Potential statewide respite coalition partners: existing peer respites, county allies, other peer-run organizations, CAMHPRO, MHSOAC, established recover-focused nonprofits, provider organizations

To Improve Peer Respite

  • Child care for parents who need peer respite, link to child-care providers (and funds)
  • Pet care at peer respites
  • Community gardens
  • Emotional support animals at peer respites
  • Lift restrictions requiring diagnosis and/or taking medications (for those that have those requirements)
  • Consistent, consumer-produced statewide quality guidelines for peer respites
  • Make peer respite more accessible to people who don’t have housing
  • Gather community input on needs
  • Creating activities that engage understanding: yoga, exercise, music, art

Toward Peer Respite in Contra Costa County

  • Public comment, presentation, plant seeds CPAW: monthly meeting for MHSA, 1st Thursday, 3-5PM in Concord
  • Apply to be on MHC (1st Wednesday, 4:30-6:30 South, West, Central) and CPAW
  • BOS meetings
  • Community forums and outreach
  • Contra Costa Mental Health/Behavioral Health Services
  • POCC/Friends of Adeline
  • Peer programs
  • Contra Costa College & Spirit Program, Spirit Alumni Group
  • Social Inclusion meeting
  • RI: lost advocacy
  • Diversity
  • Surveys of community

Other Ideas

  • Build every tier of needed resources – peer respite is just one part; use available empty housing, explore co-housing and kibbutz model

BRSS TACS April 2019 Monthly Update

Welcome to the April 2019 Monthly Update from SAMHSA’s Bringing Recovery Supports to Scale Technical Assistance Center Strategy (BRSS TACS). BRSS TACS Monthly Updates highlight upcoming events and resources that promote recovery.
In This Issue:
  • Recovery LIVE! Virtual Event: “Increasing Access to Treatment and Recovery Supports for People with Disabilities”– April 25, 2019
  • Ask the Expert
  • Funding Opportunity from the Health Resources & Services Administration
  • Now Available: Two New Resources from the National Alliance for Recovery Residences
  • Patient Scholarship Opportunity: AcademyHealth Annual Research Meeting
  • Two-part Webinar: “De-escalating the Opioid Crisis: An Overview of Promising Prevention Strategies” – April 23–24, 2019
  • Just Released: After a School Tragedy…Readiness, Response, Recovery, & Resources
  • Webinar: “Medication-Assisted Treatment in the Health Care for the Homeless Community: Strategies for Expanding Services” – May 1, 2019
  • Recommended Recovery Resources
  • Request Technical Assistance



Ask the Expert

Nev Jones, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Mental Health Law & Policy at the University of South Florida, shares ways to support college students with mental health issues.
Question: 
What can we do to improve college access and success for young people with mental health issues?
Answer
Young people with mental health issues face numerous barriers in completing a college education. There are two key strategies for improving access: better use of academic accommodations and advocacy for improved supports on campus.

In theory, academic accommodations—disability-based administrative policy and course modifications—are one of the most powerful tools we have for leveling the playing field for students with disabilities. Unfortunately, many campus disability offices lack expertise in psychiatric disabilities and may hand out lists of stock accommodations that would do little to address challenges specific to mental health. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that accommodations be carefully tailored to meet individual needs. Greater awareness of the types of accommodations for mental health conditions is critical. The resources listed below can help students and instructors develop accommodation plans that are much more likely to address complex mental health needs.

While we regularly hear about students placed on mandated leaves of absence, some campuses have taken a much more compassionate approach. For example, some campuses provide wraparound case management designed to help students connect the dots across otherwise siloed university divisions. At other universities, administrators have developed dedicated programs aimed at providing proactive supports to students with significant mental health challenges. Ideally, such supports would be available on every campus. Students, families, and providers can play a major role in expanding such programs by advocating for local funding and implementation.

To learn more, join us at Recovery LIVE!: “Increasing Access to Treatment and Recovery Supports for People with Disabilities” on April 25, 2019, and check out the following resources:

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Movement and Your Mental Health – PEERS

Movement and Your Mental Health
by Leah Harris

Our physical and mental health are deeply intertwined. The state of our mind can affect the health of our bodies. Physical activity has been widely correlated with a reduction in depression and anxiety, which in turn can increase physical well-being, which further improves mental health, and so on. Movement also offers an accessible alternative to persons who cannot afford or access traditional psychotherapy, or who have not found such therapies to be beneficial. And recently, researchers at Yale and Oxford published a study indicating that exercise may be more important to our mental health than economic status!

Images from the We Move for Health, May 3rd, 2019 at San Leandro Marina

This month, we’re taking a deeper look at the relationship between physical activity and our mental health. What kinds of physical activity are best — not just for our bodies, but for our minds? What is the “sweet spot” amount of movement that leads to the greatest mental health benefits? And what are alternative options for persons who cannot perform physical activity due to illness or disability?

A 2018 study in The Lancet found that team sports seemed to offer the greatest overall mental health benefits. The researchers analyzed Centers for Disease Control and Prevention survey data from 1.2 million adults and found — across age, gender, education status and income — people who exercised had fewer “bad mental health days” than those who didn’t. And people who played team sports reported the fewest. The study’s authors hypothesized that team sports may be so beneficial to mental health because they incorporate the added benefit of community and social support. This is especially relevant for people living with depression or other mental health conditions where isolation is common. A related benefit of team sports is built-in accountability. While you can blow off a solo walk in nature, your team is depending on you to win the game. If team sports aren’t for you, research has demonstrated the self-esteem boosting benefits of activities using synchronized group movements, such as Qi Gong or Tai Chi.

While we know that a lack of physical activity can influence the course of our mental health, more movement does not necessarily mean more benefit. A 2018 study published in The Lancet found that those who exercised more than 90 minutes a day, for most days of the month, reported worse mental health than those who moved less. Generally, researchers recommend a rule of thumb of 30-60 minutes a day, 3-5 times a week for optimum well-being.

When discussing the relationship between physical activity and mental health, it’s important to provide accessible alternatives to people with limited mobility due to disability, illness, or aging. A practice with similar physical and mental health benefits to sustained physical activity is simply spending time in nature. Just 30-40 minutes spent sitting quietly or wandering slowly in a green space, breathing mindfully, can improve mood and even immune function, according to research conducted on the Japanese practice of shinrin-yoku or “forest bathing.

Here’s to moving this spring for our mental health.

To learn more, check out these resources!

            PEERS FACEBOOK PAGE                                                 PEERS WEBSITE

Resilience Inc. – Rise and Shine News

At Resilience, Inc. we are discovering the next steps toward transformation on the evolutionary ladder of recovery and wellness. The skills and knowledge gained over the past 20 years have allowed the field to make dramatic shifts in the approaches taken to facilitate recovery from emotional distress, addiction and hard times.

The challenge now is to create a new pathway toward resilient community living.  By building on the “Aha!” moment of recovery we can create a lifetime of self-sustaining and resilient living. This is a challenge, but based on the faith it took to believe in the miracle of recovery, we trust the human spirit to be resilient.

Rise and Shine with Us!

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Message From Lori Ashcraft: Newsletter

Hello Friends,

We are certainly getting our share of April showers here in Northern California. Lots of us are tired of the rain, but not me. I love it. But I sympathize with those who complain anyway. Why not? We can’t change it anyway.

Speaking of changing things, last night I was thinking about the phrase that began to change the way we look at case management. “I’m not a case and I don’t want to be managed.” This simple phrase became the battle cry for all those on case management who wanted to be treated differently. They wanted to have a say in their treatment planning. They wanted to be treated with respect. I first heard this phrase in the early 80’s as it fell from the lips of Jay Mahler, a highly respected peer pioneer and advocate in California. Jay played a significant role in bringing into being what’s known as “the millionaire tax” that has enhanced the funding of recovery and peer programs in California.

Many professionals welcomed this shift from “managing” to “inspiring” since they knew managing wasn’t working. Trying to manage and control people did not promote recovery and healing.

I had already learned this from my early work as a care manger and I’ve shared some of those stories with you. I have another one to share this time that was the experience that finally drove this home for me. This one, Debbie’s story, is about a teenager. I think teenagers get listened to less than anyone, and I was no exception when it came to Debbie. I thought I knew what was best for her. In fact, I thought I knew more about everything than she did. Boy, was I off on the wrong foot! Take a look for yourself by going to our website by clicking on this tab Resources. Then, scroll to the bottom of the webpage and click on “Debbie’s Story” (in orange).

I’d like to think things have changed a lot since then, but I still hear awful stories about how Case Management is being carried out in some places. The addition of peers to Case Management Teams has the potential of making significant positive changes if they are given the latitude to influence the process.

Until May flowers,

Lori
XOXOXO

This Thurs. 4/11 Peer Support 4 Peer Supporters

Peer Support 4 Peer Supporters
CAMHPRO WEBINAR
This Thurs. 4/11
12 noon
Register Here

Co-facilitator:
  • Denise Walker, Senior Peer Support Specialist
  • Riverside University Health System See Bio
What’s the Focus?
  • Choose project Vision from January participant feedback
  • Review CA Stakeholder, SAMHSA, other Peer Values
  • Choose/Adopt Peer Values

SEE WWT Stakeholder-vetted Values & Ethics
SEE SAMHSA Core Competencies for Peer Workers in Behavioral Health Services
SEE Values and Ethics Copeland Center




About CAMHPRO’s Monthly Peer Webinars:
CAMHPRO has a quarterly rotation of a Spotlight with a Guest Presenter of Model Peer Support Practices, Peer Support 4 Peer Supporters (PS4PS) with a Guest Co-Facilitator, and Updates on CA Peer Specialist Standardization. THANKS TO THE CO-FACILITATOR VOLUNTEERS!
Schedule:
May, Aug, Nov, Feb:
Peer Model Spotlight—Next May 9
—Topic: Changing Organizational Culture
—Co-facilitator Kristen Mungcal, Program Manager, San Bernardino County
June, Sep, Dec, Mar:
State Peer Standardization–Next June 13
—Co-facilitator: Catherine Clay, VP of Client Advisory, Los Angeles Region
July, Oct, Jan, April:
Peer Support 4 Peer Supporters (PS4PS)–Next July 11
—Co-facilitator: Brian K. Hollander, Program Manager, Independent Living Resource Center, Inc., Santa Barbara
You only need to register once for this monthly webinar with your correct email. If you have already registered you will receive a reminder email each month with your unique link to join.
REGISTER HERE

California Poll: Mental Health Care Access, Insurance Coverage, Affordability Rank Among Top Health Care Priorities for New Governor, Legislature

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California Poll: Access to Mental Health Care, Insurance Coverage, and Affordability Rank among Californians’ Top Health Care Priorities for the New Governor and Legislature

Most Californians Say
Their Community Does Not Have Enough Mental Health Providers

Large Majorities across Parties Say Medi-Cal is Important to the State;
Most Residents Say Program is Important to Their Families;
Access to Care Remains a Challenge for Some Enrollees

 

Californians rank making health care more affordable among their top overall priorities for the state’s new governor and legislature, with 45 percent citing it as “extremely important,” just behind improving public education (48%) and ahead of affordable housing (40%), finds a new KFF (Kaiser Family Foundation)/California Health Care Foundation poll examining state health policy issues.

Among health issues, Californians’ top priorities are ensuring people with mental health problems can get treatment (49% say it is “extremely important”), making sure all Californians have access to health coverage (45%), and reducing what people pay for their health care (41%).

Mental health access ranks in the top two health priorities for Democrats, Republicans and independents alike. Half (52%) of all Californians say their community does not have enough mental health providers to serve local needs.

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“We have never before seen the public place such strong emphasis on access to mental health treatment in our national or state polls,” said KFF’s President and CEO Drew Altman.

“There is a strong sense of urgency in these mental health findings,” said Sandra R. Hernández, president and CEO of the California Health Care Foundation. “Californians are telling us loud and clear that more should be done to expand and improve mental health treatment.”

The poll also gauges Californians’ views on the Medi-Cal program and finds an overwhelming majority (91%) say Medi-Cal is “very” or “somewhat” important to the state, including large majorities of Democrats (97%), independents (90%), and Republicans (80%). About six in 10 Californians (59%) say Medi-Cal is personally important to them and their families.

READ THE REPORT METHODOLOGY

The state-wide survey of 1,404 California residents was conducted before new Gov. Gavin Newsom unveiled his budget plan and priorities, which include proposals to expand health care access, affordability and coverage. Its findings highlight many of the challenges Californians face in these areas as the governor, legislature and other policymakers weigh potential solutions. For example:

Affordability

  • More than four in 10 Californians (44%) say they or someone in their household delayed or skipped medical care in the past year because of the cost. The share rises to more than half for people who are uninsured (54%) as well as those with incomes below 200% of the federal poverty level (55%).
  • One in five (20%) say they have had problems paying household medical bills in the past year. The share is higher among those who suffer from a debilitating health condition (34%).
  • Worries about affording unexpected medical bills (63%) outrank worries about affording routine out-of-pocket medical costs (56%) and worries about affording other basic needs, including transportation (53%) and housing (52%).

Access

  • Most Californians (57%) say residents with mental health conditions are not able to get needed services, and nearly half (48%) say the same about people with alcohol and drug use problems. The share reporting lack of access is even higher among those who say they or a family member sought treatment for these problems in the past 12 months.
  • Nearly a quarter (23%) of Californians say they had to wait longer than they thought reasonable to get an appointment for medical care in the past 12 months. This includes one in three (33%) Medi-Cal enrollees.
  • Among those who say they or a family member sought treatment for a mental health condition in the past year, about a quarter (23%) say they had to wait longer than they thought reasonable to get an appointment for mental health care, a share rising to four in ten (42%) for Medi-Cal enrollees.
  • In addition to half of Californians citing a shortage of mental health providers, about a third say their communities don’t have enough primary care doctors (35%) or specialists (33%) to serve local residents, and a quarter say they don’t have enough hospitals (27%). People living in the San Joaquin Valley and the Inland Empire are more likely than other Californians to say their local community lacks adequate numbers of providers.
  • The poll finds Californians strongly support one potential idea for addressing regional provider shortages: a large majority (83%) say the state government should provide medical and nursing students with scholarships and financial help if they agree to work in areas with too few providers.

Coverage

  • Half (50%) of the uninsured in California say they have been without insurance for at least two years. The main reason people report for being uninsured is that insurance is too expensive or they cannot afford it.
  • Worries about immigration status may also contribute to some uninsured Californians’ reluctance to seek coverage. Among the uninsured, 40 percent say they are worried that signing up for insurance could draw attention to their or a family member’s immigration status.
  • Although ensuring access to insurance is a top priority for Californians, residents hold mixed views on establishing a single-payer health system in the state. About half the public (48%) favors such a plan, while four in 10 (40%) oppose it. Notably, six in ten California Republicans (62%) strongly oppose such a plan, while about half as many Democrats (32%) strongly support it.

Views on the Affordable Care Act and Covered California

Most Californians (58%) view the Affordable Care Act favorably, making the national health reform law somewhat more popular in California than the country as a whole. This may be largely due to the fact that California leans Democrat, and Democrats are more supportive of the law than independents or Republicans.

Most Californians (56%) also say the state-run health insurance marketplace, Covered California, is working well. This includes majorities of Democrats (70%) and independents (55%), but only a third of Republicans (34%).

READ THE REPORT METHODOLOGY

Designed and analyzed by researchers at KFF and the California Health Care Foundation, the California Health Policy Survey was conducted from November 12-December 27, 2018 among a random digit dial telephone sample of 1,404 adults living in California. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish by landline (476) and cell phone (928). The margin of sampling error including the design effect for the full sample is plus or minus 3 percentage points. For results based on subgroups, the margin of sampling error may be higher.

Filling the need for trusted information on national health issues, the Kaiser Family Foundation is a nonprofit organization based in San Francisco, California.

Contacts:

Rakesh Singh | (650) 854-9400 | rsingh@kff.org
Lisa Aliferis | (510) 587-3159 | laliferis@chcf.org

Join our 2nd Thursday, Peer Webinars

CAMHPRO’s PS4PS Webinar
Thursday, January 10, 2019 at noon
‘Peer Support 4 Peer Supporters’

If you’re interested in being a co-facilitator

Email Klettau7@gmail.com

You only need to register once for this monthly webinar with your correct email. If you are registered you will receive a reminder email each month with your unique link to join.

REGISTER HERE

About CAMHPRO’s Monthly Peer Webinars

Quarterly Rotation of:
— Peer Support 4 Peer Supporters (PS4PS) NEW
— Spotlight on Model Peer Practices
— State Peer Standardization Update

Schedule:
Jan, April, July, Oct: Peer Support 4 Peer Supporters
Feb, May, Aug, Nov: Peer Model Spotlight
Mar, June, Sep, Dec: State Peer Specialist Standardization Update

  1. Thu, Feb 14, 2019 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PST
  2. Thu, Mar 14, 2019 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PDT