Peer Certification is Back! SB 10!

Senator Beall has reintroduced SB 10, mental health  services: peer, parent, transition age, and family support specialist certification

See News Release from Senator Beall’s office:

Legislators Call for Urgent Action to Improve Mental Health Services and Delivery
December 03, 2018

SACRAMENTO — On the opening day of a new legislative session, lawmakers from the Senate and Assembly gathered to call for action to stem California’s mental health crisis.

“It’s no secret that access to integrated mental health services and provider shortages plague our state, resulting in deteriorated mental health outcomes for all Californians,’’ said Beall, chairman of both the Senate Mental Health Caucus and the Select Committee on Mental Health. “The lack of integrated, accessible mental health services is one of the greatest humanitarian challenges we face and we must invest in mental health infrastructure to save many, many lives.

“Early access to treatment is key. Three-quarters of all mental health issues have their onset by the age of 24. Yet adolescents and young adults are the group least likely to receive mental health care. State Auditor Elaine Howle identified that counties have millions of dollars in unspent mental health funds and the state is projecting now a massive budget surplus. With resources available and the need for comprehensive mental health so great, the time for legislation and legislators to act is now.’’

“Joining Beall were John Moorlach (R-Costa Mesa), and Assemblymembers Dr. Joaquin Arambula (D-Fresno), Kansen Chu (D-San Jose) and representatives from the Steinberg Institute, Mental Health America of California and the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

This morning, Beall introduced three bills to increase and ensure mental health services and treatment:

SB 10 increases the effectiveness of mental health and addiction supportive services by establishing a state certification process for peer providers — people with lived experiences as family members, clients, or caretakers of individuals recovering from addiction or mental illness – who guide and help their clients.

SB 11 strengthens enforcement of state and federal mental health parity laws by requiring health care service plans and health insurers to submit annual reports to the state to determine if they are complying with parity laws. The information would be available to the public on the website of either the Department Of Managed Health Care or the Department of Insurance.

SB 12 declares the intent of the Legislature to amend the existing Mental Health Services Act (Proposition 63) to authorize the state and local governments to establish at least 100 drop-in centers to meet youths’ needs. They would be modeled after the headspace project, an Australian national network comprised of “one-shop stop’’ centers for youth to ensure they have the coping skills and a support system in place for a successful transition to adulthood. In California, 17 percent of high school students reported they have seriously considered attempting suicide; 9 percent reported they have attempted suicide one or more times.

The need for mental health treatment, therapy, and counseling is high in California. Only three out of four Californians who have mental health needs receive treatment.

The legislators made clear that California must eliminate gaps in the delivery of mental health services.

Sen. Moorlach called for connecting mental health services to young people. “I think with the Mental Health Services Act and all the funding that’s available, redirecting, giving more focus, and getting things moving is so critical. We can’t have $2.5 billion sitting in bank accounts languishing when we have so many families in need,’’ he said.

Arambula said, “Our foster kids who are exposed to more trauma than most should not have to deal with the crisis of the moment by being penalized and being sent to a judicial system that is not ready to process them. Instead, we should be meeting them where they are at by providing wrap-around services, a social worker and a crisis line.’’

Chu said he supports having at least one mental health professional on school campuses. “I believe the most central location to provide wrap-around services is at the school,’’ he said.

MHSOAC Honors Mental Health Icons

If California had to pick superstars in mental health advocacy, Sally Zinman and Rusty Selix would top the list.

That was the overwhelming consensus at the Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission meeting after the Commission named its two new fellowships in honor of Zinman and Selix. The Commission named the Mental Health Policy Consumer Fellowship in Zinman’s honor and the Mental Health Policy Practitioner Fellowship in Selix’s honor.

“We want to recognize both Sally Zinman and Rusty Selix and thank them both for the work that they’ve done and for their lifetime of advocacy and dedication to mental health,” said acting Commission Chair Khatera Aslami-Tamplen.

The announcement at the Commission meeting October 25 in Alameda County was met with resounding applause and with heartfelt tributes for them both.

“Sally Zinman has been a lifelong advocate for those of us living with mental health challenges and has been a leader in the consumer and peer movement across the country,” Aslami-Tamplen said. “She’s been a strong voice for self-empowerment, self-determination, consumer rights and for people living with mental health unmet needs, working to eliminate stigma and discrimination and uphold the civil rights of individuals with mental health challenges. We are honored to name the MHSOAC Mental Health Consumer Fellowship after Sally Zinman.”

State Senator and Commissioner Jim Beall presented Zinman with a framed resolution from the California State Senate.

“I’m really honored, Sally, to present you with this resolution from our California State Senate on their behalf,” Beall said. “Congratulations and maybe you can be a mentor for all these interns. We want them to be the future leaders in mental health in California and that’s what we are creating, the future leaders so congratulations and thank you for doing this work.”

Zinman called the honor, an honor for consumers.

“I see this as honoring all the consumers I have met and talked to, whose voices are in my ears and whose ideas I’ve listened to because I’m really them,” she said. “What I know and what I pass on and the work that I do is a collection of all of them.  I feel like I’m just a vehicle for all those people, the 41 years of their ideas and visions. That’s all in my mind so when you are naming a fellowship after me, you are naming it after consumers, after our consumer movement and after the values that we try to infuse into the system.”

Zinman said that she hoped that the future fellows would instill the values of the collective consumers into the Commission’s work.

“I know that the fellowship will help their careers and teach them a lot in terms of policy and I see them as teaching you all,” she said. “It’s really a vehicle for bringing those values and our principles to the Commission and to the larger mental health system. I thank you for honoring the consumer values and principles and movement by naming this fellowship after myself because that’s who I am. Thank you for the opportunity to continue that by having a person every day at your offices infusing the values of the consumer movement into this Commission.”

Aaron Ortiz, of La Familia Counseling Services in the Bay Area, praised Zinman for her tireless work on behalf of consumers. “I want to say thank you to Sally for really empowering the consumer and I’d like to announce that La Familia will be opening a peer respite facility in January and we’re going to name it after Sally for all of her work and it’s going to be called Sally’s Place.”

Several speakers called both Zinman and Selix mentors who inspired their work and commitment to mental health and said the Commission chose the right people as the Fellowships’ namesakes.

Rusty Salix could not attend the meeting. Selix co-authored the Mental Health Services Act, along with then-State Senator and now Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg.

“Rusty Selix has contributed to our mental health movement tremendously and we wouldn’t be here today without the contributions of Rusty Selix,” Aslami-Tamplen said.  “He has been a strong and stabilizing voice for destigmatizing mental health challenges and building a continuum of care. We are honored to name the MHSOAC Policy Practitioner Fellowship after Rusty Selix and present him with a resolution for his lifetime of dedication to mental health.”

Executive Director Toby Ewing said Selix was instrumental in pushing many of California’s groundbreaking mental health system changes. “Rusty shared this much grander vision around opportunities for education, around ways to engage our public safety partners, around ways to engage the medical community and primary care and he’s continued to push this vision and as it is represented now in the Act and how we in California are really trying to transform that system from the fail-first system to one that is recovery oriented that really is about prevention and early intervention and is about innovation.”

He added that globally, others are starting to recognize the value of California’s mental health system.

“Rusty laid the foundation for not only for what we’re seeing today as far as fundamental improvements in our mental health system, but also the expanded global attention that you see,” Ewing said. “People do now recognize that mental health is foundational to quality of life. And we’re beginning to see how other states and other countries begin to look at what California is doing as a strategy for improving the mental health systems in their own communities.”

LINKED ARTICLE

Macro Advocacy Project – Los Angeles

Los Angeles peers, sponsored by Project Return, Peer Support Network,  and CAMHPRO advocating at the Capitol. One picture is of a group of us after we visited Senator Jim Beall’s office, author of SB 906, the peer certification bill. 
 
The Los Angeles novice advocates participated in a Macro Advocacy Project that trained peers on advocacy skills. CAMHPRO consulted on this project. The project culminated in the group coming to Sacramento and advocating for the bills they selected to support.
The intention of the Macro Advocacy Project was to train individuals on the state legislative process and how to effectively promote and advocate for legislation.

Photos curtesy of Sally Zinman May 2018

ACAPS 2nd Cohort

WEBINAR: What is ACAPS?

Find out by watching the
Previously Recorded Webinar

from Monday, Feb 26, 2018

This webinar is for potential participants in the Alameda County Accelerated Peer Specialist Program (ACAPS), a training and placement program of the California Association of Peer Run Organizations (CAMHPRO.)

At this webinar you will learn the following:

  • The goals of ACAPS, an 18 month Alameda County focused program.
  • ACAPS training and employment partners
  • The kinds of trainings being offered
  • How to apply to be a participant of the trainings: ACAPS Participant Application Second Cohort



Alameda County Accelerated
Peer Specialist Program

ACAPS FLYER

ACAPS Participant Application

Get five weeks of accelerated peer specialist training
Receive on-going employment mentorship and peer support
Find employment or volunteer positions at different mental health programs in Alameda County run by … La Familia, Alameda County Network of Mental Health Clients, the Pool of Consumer Champions, and Bay Area Community

For more information and an application, contact Melodee Au at melodee.camhpro@gmail.com 415-361- 0613

Training Schedule

First Training Cohort
COMPLETE 

BestNow!
Friday, April 13 through
Thursday, May 3
Every Monday, Wednesday,
Thursday, and Friday
10am-3pm

PEERS
Monday, May 21 through
Wednesday, May 23
9am-4pm

Growing Through
Monday, June 11 through Friday,
June 15
9am-6pm

Second Training Cohort
ACAPS Participant Application Second Cohort

BestNow!
Monday, July 9 through
Thursday, July 26
Monday through Thursday
10am-3pm

PEERS
Monday, August 27 through
Wednesday, August 29
9am-4pm

Growing Through
Monday, September 24 through
Friday, September 28
9am-6pm

Third Training Cohort
Application coming soon

PEERS
Monday, October 8 through
Wednesday, October 10
9am-4pm

BestNow!
Monday, October 22 through
Thursday, November 8
Monday through Thursday
10am-3pm

Growing Through
Monday, December 10 through
Friday, December 14
9am-6pm

For more information and an application, contact Melodee Au at melodee.camhpro@gmail.com 415-361- 0613

Don’t Forget the ABCs of Advocacy!

A series of three webinars on the basics and details of how you can participate in the California community program planning process in a meaningful and effective manner.

“CAMHPRO’s ABC’s of Advocacy” is a series of three webinars on the basics and details of how you can participate in the California community program planning process in a meaningful and effective manner. These three webinars are interactive through polling, questions and answers, and prompt you to take the next steps. These webinars also serve as recommended training prior to CAMHPRO’s local onsite six-hour workshop, “Delivering Your ABC’s of Advocacy” customized to the specific county where it is to be held (scheduled by request).

Audience: California stakeholders of public behavioral health policy and services: primarily consumers, and also family members, community based organizations, county staff and conveners of community program planning meetings.

Schedule of Webinars

Webinar A: Advocacy Basics
April 4, 2018 at 10:00 AM
REGISTER HERE

What will be covered:

  • What is advocacy, who are stakeholders and why advocate.
  • Consumer roots of the law, the Mental Health Service Act (MHSA) and regulations for Stakeholder involvement in planning mental health services.
  • A bird’s eye view of who the County decision-makers are and how you can participate.
  • Access to basic terms and acronyms used in Behavioral Health and where you can go to find county contacts.

Webinar B: Best Community Planning Practices
April 18, 2018 at 10:00 AM
REGISTER HERE

What will be covered:

  • Types of County meetings and various stakeholder participation or roles
  • Meeting mechanics, culture and etiquette
  • MHSA stakeholder community planning best principles & practices applied to different stakeholder roles.
  • What to look for in county budgets and plans.
  • More resources to become a meaningful stakeholder

Webinar C: Community Planning; How to Work It
May 2, 2018 at 10:00 AM
REGISTER HERE

What will be covered:

  • More on applying the MHSA community planning best principles & practices
  • How you compose and give public comment.
  • How you get on decision-making boards/councils.
  • Next steps to being a meaningful stakeholder.

Presenters:

  • Karin Lettau, Director of Training
  • Sally Zinman, CAMHPRO Executive Director

Funded by the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

SB 906 Support Letter

Fill out the template!
Email your letter today!

SB 906 Support Letter Template

Fill out the above template!
Email your letter today!

SB 906 makes sense from both a policy and fiscal perspective and will provide more comprehensive assistance to people in need. Please do your part to bring California up to speed with the rest of the nation in recovery and resiliency services through a State protocol for Medi-CAL billing and Certification of peer and family support specialists.

SB 906: Peer Certification 
introduced by
Senator Beall and Senator Anderson

CAMHPRO and California stakeholders
We look forward to working with both Senators, co authors Hertzberg and Pan, and the bill’s sponsor, the Steinberg Institute, to bring long awaited peer certification to California.

SB 906 The Bill

Peer Provider Certification Fact Sheet

Peer Certification SB 906, First Hearing March 14: Send Support Letters Now!

Join the strong tide of California organizations, counties and people advocating for growth in high quality peer/family support services and peer specialist career development in supporting SB 906, to finally bring peer certification to California.

 

WRITE LETTERS!
VISIT THE HEALTH COMMITTEE MEETING!

SB 906 (Beall (D) and Anderson (R) Goes to the Health Committee Wednesday March 14 at 1:30 pm.

Use these documents to make your voice heard

Health Committee Meeting:
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2008

State Capitol, Room 2191
Sacramento, CA 95814
Phone: (916) 651-4111
Website

CAMHPRO and California stakeholders look forward to working with both Senators, co authors Hertzberg and Pan, and the bill’s sponsor, the Steinberg Institute, to bring long awaited peer certification to California.