Sally’s Place Open House: Alameda County’s First Peer-Run Adult Respite

Aaron Ortiz, of La Familia Counseling Services in the Bay Area, praised Zinman for her tireless work on behalf of consumers. “I’d like to announce that La Familia will be opening a peer respite facility in January.”

Sally Zinman’s Place is the first peer-run adult respite in Alameda County. It’s been a long time in the making, and we would love for you to join in the celebration. See you there!

JANUARY 9, 2019
1:00 – 4:00 P.M.
1525 B. STREET, HAYWARD

Aaron Ortiz, of La Familia Counseling Services in the Bay Area, praised Zinman for her tireless work on behalf of consumers. “I want to say thank you to Sally for really empowering the consumer and I’d like to announce that La Familia will be opening a peer respite facility in January and we’re going to name it after Sally for all of her work and it’s going to be called Sally’s Place.” READ FULL ARTICLE

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FOR MORE DETAILS ABOUT THE
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES ACT
VISIT THESE LINKS:

MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES ACT

THE ACT

Peer Certification is Back! SB 10!

Senator Beall has reintroduced SB 10, mental health  services: peer, parent, transition age, and family support specialist certification

See News Release from Senator Beall’s office:

Legislators Call for Urgent Action to Improve Mental Health Services and Delivery
December 03, 2018

SACRAMENTO — On the opening day of a new legislative session, lawmakers from the Senate and Assembly gathered to call for action to stem California’s mental health crisis.

“It’s no secret that access to integrated mental health services and provider shortages plague our state, resulting in deteriorated mental health outcomes for all Californians,’’ said Beall, chairman of both the Senate Mental Health Caucus and the Select Committee on Mental Health. “The lack of integrated, accessible mental health services is one of the greatest humanitarian challenges we face and we must invest in mental health infrastructure to save many, many lives.

“Early access to treatment is key. Three-quarters of all mental health issues have their onset by the age of 24. Yet adolescents and young adults are the group least likely to receive mental health care. State Auditor Elaine Howle identified that counties have millions of dollars in unspent mental health funds and the state is projecting now a massive budget surplus. With resources available and the need for comprehensive mental health so great, the time for legislation and legislators to act is now.’’

“Joining Beall were John Moorlach (R-Costa Mesa), and Assemblymembers Dr. Joaquin Arambula (D-Fresno), Kansen Chu (D-San Jose) and representatives from the Steinberg Institute, Mental Health America of California and the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

This morning, Beall introduced three bills to increase and ensure mental health services and treatment:

SB 10 increases the effectiveness of mental health and addiction supportive services by establishing a state certification process for peer providers — people with lived experiences as family members, clients, or caretakers of individuals recovering from addiction or mental illness – who guide and help their clients.

SB 11 strengthens enforcement of state and federal mental health parity laws by requiring health care service plans and health insurers to submit annual reports to the state to determine if they are complying with parity laws. The information would be available to the public on the website of either the Department Of Managed Health Care or the Department of Insurance.

SB 12 declares the intent of the Legislature to amend the existing Mental Health Services Act (Proposition 63) to authorize the state and local governments to establish at least 100 drop-in centers to meet youths’ needs. They would be modeled after the headspace project, an Australian national network comprised of “one-shop stop’’ centers for youth to ensure they have the coping skills and a support system in place for a successful transition to adulthood. In California, 17 percent of high school students reported they have seriously considered attempting suicide; 9 percent reported they have attempted suicide one or more times.

The need for mental health treatment, therapy, and counseling is high in California. Only three out of four Californians who have mental health needs receive treatment.

The legislators made clear that California must eliminate gaps in the delivery of mental health services.

Sen. Moorlach called for connecting mental health services to young people. “I think with the Mental Health Services Act and all the funding that’s available, redirecting, giving more focus, and getting things moving is so critical. We can’t have $2.5 billion sitting in bank accounts languishing when we have so many families in need,’’ he said.

Arambula said, “Our foster kids who are exposed to more trauma than most should not have to deal with the crisis of the moment by being penalized and being sent to a judicial system that is not ready to process them. Instead, we should be meeting them where they are at by providing wrap-around services, a social worker and a crisis line.’’

Chu said he supports having at least one mental health professional on school campuses. “I believe the most central location to provide wrap-around services is at the school,’’ he said.

MHSOAC Honors Mental Health Icons

If California had to pick superstars in mental health advocacy, Sally Zinman and Rusty Selix would top the list.

That was the overwhelming consensus at the Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission meeting after the Commission named its two new fellowships in honor of Zinman and Selix. The Commission named the Mental Health Policy Consumer Fellowship in Zinman’s honor and the Mental Health Policy Practitioner Fellowship in Selix’s honor.

“We want to recognize both Sally Zinman and Rusty Selix and thank them both for the work that they’ve done and for their lifetime of advocacy and dedication to mental health,” said acting Commission Chair Khatera Aslami-Tamplen.

The announcement at the Commission meeting October 25 in Alameda County was met with resounding applause and with heartfelt tributes for them both.

“Sally Zinman has been a lifelong advocate for those of us living with mental health challenges and has been a leader in the consumer and peer movement across the country,” Aslami-Tamplen said. “She’s been a strong voice for self-empowerment, self-determination, consumer rights and for people living with mental health unmet needs, working to eliminate stigma and discrimination and uphold the civil rights of individuals with mental health challenges. We are honored to name the MHSOAC Mental Health Consumer Fellowship after Sally Zinman.”

State Senator and Commissioner Jim Beall presented Zinman with a framed resolution from the California State Senate.

“I’m really honored, Sally, to present you with this resolution from our California State Senate on their behalf,” Beall said. “Congratulations and maybe you can be a mentor for all these interns. We want them to be the future leaders in mental health in California and that’s what we are creating, the future leaders so congratulations and thank you for doing this work.”

Zinman called the honor, an honor for consumers.

“I see this as honoring all the consumers I have met and talked to, whose voices are in my ears and whose ideas I’ve listened to because I’m really them,” she said. “What I know and what I pass on and the work that I do is a collection of all of them.  I feel like I’m just a vehicle for all those people, the 41 years of their ideas and visions. That’s all in my mind so when you are naming a fellowship after me, you are naming it after consumers, after our consumer movement and after the values that we try to infuse into the system.”

Zinman said that she hoped that the future fellows would instill the values of the collective consumers into the Commission’s work.

“I know that the fellowship will help their careers and teach them a lot in terms of policy and I see them as teaching you all,” she said. “It’s really a vehicle for bringing those values and our principles to the Commission and to the larger mental health system. I thank you for honoring the consumer values and principles and movement by naming this fellowship after myself because that’s who I am. Thank you for the opportunity to continue that by having a person every day at your offices infusing the values of the consumer movement into this Commission.”

Aaron Ortiz, of La Familia Counseling Services in the Bay Area, praised Zinman for her tireless work on behalf of consumers. “I want to say thank you to Sally for really empowering the consumer and I’d like to announce that La Familia will be opening a peer respite facility in January and we’re going to name it after Sally for all of her work and it’s going to be called Sally’s Place.”

Several speakers called both Zinman and Selix mentors who inspired their work and commitment to mental health and said the Commission chose the right people as the Fellowships’ namesakes.

Rusty Salix could not attend the meeting. Selix co-authored the Mental Health Services Act, along with then-State Senator and now Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg.

“Rusty Selix has contributed to our mental health movement tremendously and we wouldn’t be here today without the contributions of Rusty Selix,” Aslami-Tamplen said.  “He has been a strong and stabilizing voice for destigmatizing mental health challenges and building a continuum of care. We are honored to name the MHSOAC Policy Practitioner Fellowship after Rusty Selix and present him with a resolution for his lifetime of dedication to mental health.”

Executive Director Toby Ewing said Selix was instrumental in pushing many of California’s groundbreaking mental health system changes. “Rusty shared this much grander vision around opportunities for education, around ways to engage our public safety partners, around ways to engage the medical community and primary care and he’s continued to push this vision and as it is represented now in the Act and how we in California are really trying to transform that system from the fail-first system to one that is recovery oriented that really is about prevention and early intervention and is about innovation.”

He added that globally, others are starting to recognize the value of California’s mental health system.

“Rusty laid the foundation for not only for what we’re seeing today as far as fundamental improvements in our mental health system, but also the expanded global attention that you see,” Ewing said. “People do now recognize that mental health is foundational to quality of life. And we’re beginning to see how other states and other countries begin to look at what California is doing as a strategy for improving the mental health systems in their own communities.”

LINKED ARTICLE

Webinar: 11/8 Peer Specialist Model Practice Spotlight, State Standardization and Peer Support 4 Peer Supporters

Thursday, Nov 8, 2018 at Noon

Peer Model Spotlight Webinar

Topic: Growing Grassroots Peer Run Organizations

Presenters:

Analuisa Orozco, Peer Specialist, MSW, LCSW, Founding Director,Living in Wellness Center, Adin, Modoc County. Living in Wellness recently received a grant to provide Equine (Horse) Therapy

Julie Prentice, Certified Peer Specialist (MA & FL) & Kathie Tunstall Lanatti, Peer LMFT, Co-Founders, Making Magic Happen-People Helping People, Petaluma, Sonoma County. Making Magic Happen-People Helping People provides services on a “Paying It Forward” model.

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New SAMHSA Tool: Using Data to Improve Effective Responses to Individuals in Crisis

Crisis Intervention Teams (CIT) have shown effectiveness in decreasing the number of mental-health related arrests while increasing public safety. To support communities in creating and evaluating their own crisis intervention teams, SAMHSA has published a new report titled:

Crisis Intervention Team Methods for using Data to Inform Practice: A Step-by-Step Guide.

Crisis Intervention Teams: A Collective

National Alliance of Mental Illness (NAMI) CIT programs
CA gov CIT
International Crisis Intervention
SFPD Crisis Intervention
Berkley Police Department

SB 906 Peer Cert. VETOED! Persistence is key!

From Sally Zinman, Executive Director, CAMHPRO

Governor Brown has Vetoed SB 906. The consumer and larger mental health stakeholder community will pursue California state certification and, by all accounts, will have a better chance with a new Governor.

Persistence is the key to success, and essential to advocacy. Persistence and hope. We will have peer certification in California!

See the Governor’s veto message (below), which in my opinion, is not knowledgeable of the purpose or content of the bill.

~Sally~

 VETO MESSAGE

Senator Beall's Response to SB 906 Veto.JPG

Today 9/25 11a.m. Mental Health Peer Specialist: Ethics and Boundaries Webinar

Doors to Wellbeing
Peer Specialist Monthly Webinar Series

9/25 11am: Mental Health Peer Specialist: Ethics and Boundaries
REGISTER HERE

This webinar will provide a brief overview of ethics and boundaries of peer support particularly for those who support people with substance use disorders. Looking through the value of lived experience, we will discuss the specific ethical dilemmas related to supporting individuals with a co-occurring substance use and mental health diagnosis.  Additionally, we will review the benefit of using community-based supports to address unique challenges and support recovery.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the ethical duties of a peer support specialists.
  • Describe ethics and boundaries for supporting individuals with co-occurring substance use disorders and mental health diagnosis.
  • Discuss strategies to overcome unique challenges for peer support specialists when working with people with substance use disorders and mental health diagnoses.
Presenter Bios:

Ron Clark is a certified peer support specialist in North Carolina. Ron is a member of the Mecklenburg County Homeless Service Network Advocacy and Employment Committee, the Mecklenburg County Drug Free Coalition and the Carolina Healthcare Systems Advisory Board for the Traumatic Brain Injury 12 Step Recovery program.

Ron Clark began his Human Services career with Cardinal Innovations, as a Member Engagement Specialists with a focus on Substance Use Disorder and Mental Health in 2014. Prior to working for Cardinal Innovations, Ron was able to use his passion to help others as a technician with the Displaced Homemaker Program, part of the Domestic Violence Unit for the Mecklenburg County Women’s Commission.

ACAPS 3rd Cohort, application due date extended to Oct. 1! Don’t miss this opportunity!

Alameda County Accelerated
Peer Specialist Program (ACAPS)

Third cohort begins in October 2018.

Fact Sheet for ACAPS Letterhead

ACAPS Third Cohort APPLICATION

Don’t miss out on the final opportunity to participate in ACAPS, a training and placement program.

The California Association of Mental Health Peer Run Organizations (CAMHPRO) is a non profit statewide consumer run advocacy organization. CAMHPRO’s  mission is to transform communities and the system for all those affected by mental health issues by championing the work of consumer-run organizations. CAMHPRO strives to empower, support, and ensure the rights of consumers, eliminate stigma, and advance self-determination and choice.

CAMHPRO invites applications for Alameda County Accelerated Peer Specialist Program (ACAPS) training and employment placement opportunity.  CAMHPRO is proud to partner with Alameda County Network of Mental Health Clients, Bay Area Community Services, Best NOW!, La Familia, Peers Empowerment and Recovery Services, and the Pool of Consumer Champions/ACBHCS in this Project.

Circulate to any mental health consumer/peer who might be interested.

Applications are due soon

October 1, 2018!

THE FACTS

  1. ACAPS is a CAMHPRO 18 month program funded by the Office of Statewide Planning and Development.
  2. The goal of ACAPS is engagement, training and placement in Alameda County’s public mental health system of peer specialists who bring a wide array of lived experience to their
  3. ACAPS is a partnership of CAMHPRO; Pool of Consumer Champions (POCC), Alameda County Behavioral Health Care Services (ACBHCS); La Familia;   Best NOW!/Alameda County Network of Mental Health Clients;  the Berkeley Drop-In Center and Reaching Across, Alameda County Network of Mental Health Clients; Peers Envisioning and Engaging Recovery Services (PEERS);and Bay Area Community Services (BACS).
  4. ACAPS will offer a three part training program that includes 1) 60-hour Introductory Peer Specialist Intensive 2) Three-day Wellness Recovery Action Planning (WRAP) and 3) a 40-hour advanced skills training in peer support for people experiencing crisis, distress and suicidality. These trainings will be offered to three (3) different cohorts.
  5. ACAPS will place 40 people with lived experience in programs throughout Alameda County. These positions can be volunteer (stipend).
  6. Potential placements include: 15 peers at La Familia programs, including the peer respite; two (2) peers at drop in centers in southern and northern Alameda County run by Alameda County Network of Mental Health Clients; 20 peers at the Pool of Consumer Champions (POOC): and, at a minimum, six (6) peers placed in different programs of Bay Area Community Services (BACS), one being a residential crisis facility.
  7. Services also include career counseling at the time of training and throughout the program, and support once a person is employed.

Fact Sheet for ACAPS Letterhead

ACAPS Third Cohort APPLICATION

Circulate to any mental health consumer/peer who might be interested.

SB 906 Peer Certification, ON Governor’s Desk! Write Letters! Send Emails!

Update SB 906 information. ON Governor’s desk. Officially received on September 12. He has a certain amount of days after he officially receives the bill to veto or approve the it. Only have about 10 days to influence the decision of the Governor. Write letters!

Contact Donna Campbell
Health Aide to the Governor donna.campbell@gov.ca.gov
Fax support for the bill to: 916-558-3177

SB906 Support Letter Sample Template 2.15.18:
This is a sample letter you can recreate and use for your own purposes. Send letters! Email Donna!

Sept. 6: SAMHSA’s Kick-Off for Recovery Month “Join the Voices for Recovery”

Join SAMHSA’s kick-off for Recovery Month on September 6 at 10.a.m. through a livestream event.

Panelists will discuss the benefits that their SAMHSA-funded treatment and recovery programs bring to their community. The kick-off event exemplifies the 2018 Recovery Month theme, “Join the Voices for Recovery: Invest in Health, Home, Purpose, and Community,” which explores how integrated care, a strong community, sense of purpose, and leadership contributes to effective treatments that sustain the recovery of persons with mental and substance use disorders. For more information on Recovery Month, or to access materials or find events in your community, visit the Recovery Month website at https://recoverymonth.gov.

FROM SAMHSA EVENT CALENDAR

Event Description: 
For 29 years, SAMHSA has worked to educate Americans about effective, evidence-based treatment and recovery services, highlighting the fact that people can and do recover! Through National Recovery Month (Recovery Month), SAMHSA aims to help bring awareness to mental and substance use disorders; encourage those in need to seek support; and make recovery the standard.
Join us via live stream Thursday, September 6 from 10am-11am, as we officially kick off Recovery Month 2018 – a national observance held every September to celebrate individuals living in recovery and to educate the public on mental and substance use disorders. The event will feature SAMHSA officials and invited guests in a panel discussion to celebrate people living in recovery.
Click here https://www.hhs.gov/live/live-2/index.htm to watch the event. This year’s theme is “Join the Voices for Recovery: Invest in Health, Home, Purpose, and Community.” The 2018 Recovery Month toolkit, television and radio public service announcements (PSAs), banners and logos are now available to view and download here. We encourage you to share these materials throughout the month of September, post the Recovery Month banner on your website, and help spread the possibility of recovery!
Type of Event: 
Special Celebrations – Celebrates people in recovery, lauds the contributions of treatment and service
Is this event open to public?: 
Yes
Estimated Number of Attendees: 
500

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Is this a virtual event (taking place online)?: 
No
Is this event in the United States?: 
Yes
200 Independence Ave
Washington DC
U.S. State:
District of Columbia
20201
Website for additional information: 

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Hosting Organization Name:  SAMHSA
Contact Name:  Recovery Month Team
Phone:  2402762617