Movement and Your Mental Health – PEERS

Movement and Your Mental Health
by Leah Harris

Our physical and mental health are deeply intertwined. The state of our mind can affect the health of our bodies. Physical activity has been widely correlated with a reduction in depression and anxiety, which in turn can increase physical well-being, which further improves mental health, and so on. Movement also offers an accessible alternative to persons who cannot afford or access traditional psychotherapy, or who have not found such therapies to be beneficial. And recently, researchers at Yale and Oxford published a study indicating that exercise may be more important to our mental health than economic status!

Images from the We Move for Health, May 3rd, 2019 at San Leandro Marina

This month, we’re taking a deeper look at the relationship between physical activity and our mental health. What kinds of physical activity are best — not just for our bodies, but for our minds? What is the “sweet spot” amount of movement that leads to the greatest mental health benefits? And what are alternative options for persons who cannot perform physical activity due to illness or disability?

A 2018 study in The Lancet found that team sports seemed to offer the greatest overall mental health benefits. The researchers analyzed Centers for Disease Control and Prevention survey data from 1.2 million adults and found — across age, gender, education status and income — people who exercised had fewer “bad mental health days” than those who didn’t. And people who played team sports reported the fewest. The study’s authors hypothesized that team sports may be so beneficial to mental health because they incorporate the added benefit of community and social support. This is especially relevant for people living with depression or other mental health conditions where isolation is common. A related benefit of team sports is built-in accountability. While you can blow off a solo walk in nature, your team is depending on you to win the game. If team sports aren’t for you, research has demonstrated the self-esteem boosting benefits of activities using synchronized group movements, such as Qi Gong or Tai Chi.

While we know that a lack of physical activity can influence the course of our mental health, more movement does not necessarily mean more benefit. A 2018 study published in The Lancet found that those who exercised more than 90 minutes a day, for most days of the month, reported worse mental health than those who moved less. Generally, researchers recommend a rule of thumb of 30-60 minutes a day, 3-5 times a week for optimum well-being.

When discussing the relationship between physical activity and mental health, it’s important to provide accessible alternatives to people with limited mobility due to disability, illness, or aging. A practice with similar physical and mental health benefits to sustained physical activity is simply spending time in nature. Just 30-40 minutes spent sitting quietly or wandering slowly in a green space, breathing mindfully, can improve mood and even immune function, according to research conducted on the Japanese practice of shinrin-yoku or “forest bathing.

Here’s to moving this spring for our mental health.

To learn more, check out these resources!

            PEERS FACEBOOK PAGE                                                 PEERS WEBSITE

Webinar: 11/8 Peer Specialist Model Practice Spotlight, State Standardization and Peer Support 4 Peer Supporters

Thursday, Nov 8, 2018 at Noon

Peer Model Spotlight Webinar

Topic: Growing Grassroots Peer Run Organizations

Presenters:

Analuisa Orozco, Peer Specialist, MSW, LCSW, Founding Director,Living in Wellness Center, Adin, Modoc County. Living in Wellness recently received a grant to provide Equine (Horse) Therapy

Julie Prentice, Certified Peer Specialist (MA & FL) & Kathie Tunstall Lanatti, Peer LMFT, Co-Founders, Making Magic Happen-People Helping People, Petaluma, Sonoma County. Making Magic Happen-People Helping People provides services on a “Paying It Forward” model.

unnamed.jpg

Need to Talk to a Peer? CA Warmlines!

This List is copied from the National Empowerment Center

Project Return Peer Support Network 

2677 1/2 Zoe Ave
Huntington Park, CA 90255
Project Return Peer Support Website

Now accepting calls nationwide
Warmline hours
Monday-Friday 5p-10pm; Saturday 11am-4pm
(888) 448-9777 English
(888) 448-4055 Spanish

The OC Warmline – NAMI Orange County

(714) 991-6412
Hours:
9am to 3am Monday-Friday;
10am to 3am Saturday and Sunday
Languages: English, Spanish, Vietnamese and Farsi
Interpreter Services available

Peer Warmline Connection

(707) 565-4466
Hours:
Friday – Sunday evenings, 5:30pm-9:30pm

San Diego Warmline for San Diego residents

(619) 295-1055
Open 3:30 PM to 11:00 PM 7 days a week.

San Joaquin

(209) 468-3585 or 1(888) 468-9370
Operating 24/7 since July of 2008.
For local San Joaquin County residents only.

Northern Valley Talk Line

Butte County, California
A confidential non-crisis peer support network.
You are not alone, we are here to listen.

Toll Free: 1-855-582-5554
Open 4:30 pm-9:30 pm 7days/week 365 days/year
Talk line is funded by Butte County Mental Health & MHSA funding

SAMHSA releases updated Opioid Overdose Prevention Toolkit

Originally posted on the SAMHSA website:

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) announces the update of an important resource on opioid overdose prevention. The SAMHSA Opioid Overdose Prevention Toolkit offers information and facts from literature and links to resources to prevent opioid-related overdoses and deaths. Because interdisciplinary collaboration is critical to success, SAMHSA offers theToolkit as an educational resource for community members, first responders, prescribers, patients, and families.

The SAMHSA Opioid Overdose Prevention Toolkit is divided into four sections—one for each target audience:

Facts for Community Members

  • Facts about opioids and opioid-related overdoses
  • Information about who is at risk
  • Strategies to prevent overdose deaths

Five Essential Steps for First Responders

  • Recommended actions to reduce the number of deaths resulting from opioid overdoses
  • Dos and Don’ts when responding to an opioid overdose

Information for Prescribers

  • Recommendations to consider when prescribing opioids for adults with chronic pain
  • Information on billing codes for providing overdose prevention education and for prescribing naloxone
  • Explanation of how to treat an overdose
  • Resources to determine legal and liability considerations

Safety Advice for Patients & Family Members

  • Information about preventing overdose and what to do when an overdose is suspected
  • Explanation of naloxone, how to use it, and how to store it
  • Resources for overdose survivors and family members and information on finding a support network

 

Download the toolkit!