Resilience Inc. – Rise and Shine News

At Resilience, Inc. we are discovering the next steps toward transformation on the evolutionary ladder of recovery and wellness. The skills and knowledge gained over the past 20 years have allowed the field to make dramatic shifts in the approaches taken to facilitate recovery from emotional distress, addiction and hard times.

The challenge now is to create a new pathway toward resilient community living.  By building on the “Aha!” moment of recovery we can create a lifetime of self-sustaining and resilient living. This is a challenge, but based on the faith it took to believe in the miracle of recovery, we trust the human spirit to be resilient.

Rise and Shine with Us!

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Message From Lori Ashcraft: Newsletter

Hello Friends,

We are certainly getting our share of April showers here in Northern California. Lots of us are tired of the rain, but not me. I love it. But I sympathize with those who complain anyway. Why not? We can’t change it anyway.

Speaking of changing things, last night I was thinking about the phrase that began to change the way we look at case management. “I’m not a case and I don’t want to be managed.” This simple phrase became the battle cry for all those on case management who wanted to be treated differently. They wanted to have a say in their treatment planning. They wanted to be treated with respect. I first heard this phrase in the early 80’s as it fell from the lips of Jay Mahler, a highly respected peer pioneer and advocate in California. Jay played a significant role in bringing into being what’s known as “the millionaire tax” that has enhanced the funding of recovery and peer programs in California.

Many professionals welcomed this shift from “managing” to “inspiring” since they knew managing wasn’t working. Trying to manage and control people did not promote recovery and healing.

I had already learned this from my early work as a care manger and I’ve shared some of those stories with you. I have another one to share this time that was the experience that finally drove this home for me. This one, Debbie’s story, is about a teenager. I think teenagers get listened to less than anyone, and I was no exception when it came to Debbie. I thought I knew what was best for her. In fact, I thought I knew more about everything than she did. Boy, was I off on the wrong foot! Take a look for yourself by going to our website by clicking on this tab Resources. Then, scroll to the bottom of the webpage and click on “Debbie’s Story” (in orange).

I’d like to think things have changed a lot since then, but I still hear awful stories about how Case Management is being carried out in some places. The addition of peers to Case Management Teams has the potential of making significant positive changes if they are given the latitude to influence the process.

Until May flowers,

Lori
XOXOXO