SB 10 Peer Certification VETOED – again

Governor Newsom Takes Final Action of 2019 Legislative Season
Published: 

LINK TO ALL FINAL ACTIONS

OFFICAL SB 10 VETO MESSAGE

*From the website*
Joint accomplishments include urgently addressing California’s affordability crisis by passing the Nation’s strongest statewide rent protections, expanding health care coverage and passing legislation to lower prescription drug prices

Focused on effective government by fortifying state against natural disasters and economic downturns – passing historic wildfire safety legislation and creating largest rainy day fund Ensuring justice for all Californians by passing historic clean drinking water legislation and taking on powerful institutions on behalf of everyday Californians

“Together, we have accomplished a great deal this year to help California families get ahead and made historic progress on some of the state’s most intractable challenges.”

SACRAMENTO — Governor Gavin Newsom took his final actions of the 2019 legislative season today and thanked the Legislature for their work and accomplishment on enacting 870 bills in the following statement:

“I want to take a moment to congratulate the Legislature on their work this year and to thank Senate President pro Tempore Toni Atkins and Speaker of the Assembly Anthony Rendon for their leadership. Together, we have accomplished a great deal this year – through the budget and legislation – that helps California families get ahead and tackles some of the state’s most intractable problems.

“This year, California passed the nation’s strongest renter protection package. Our state made record housing and homeless investments paired with big new tools for housing production. We moved California closer to universal health care coverage by expanding coverage, increasing Covered California subsidies for middle-income Californians and taking on rising prescription drug prices. 

“California, faced with catastrophic wildfires, invested $1 billion to prevent, mitigate and recover from wildfires, disasters and emergencies. And in July, our state enacted something that few people thought could be done – wildfire legislation that moved California closer to a safer, reliable and affordable energy future.

“Our state is doing more now than at any point in our history to help California families tackle the challenges of affordability and provide opportunity to all Californians – more than doubling tax cuts for working families, expanding paid family leave, increasing access to early childhood education, and taking on payday lenders. 

“On education, California brought disparate sides in the education community together and forged a historic agreement on changes to charter school law that was years in the making. We invested more in K-14 education than at any point in our history, and put on next year’s ballot the chance to make long-overdue investments in school infrastructure and safety. California made two years of community college tuition-free, increased financial aid for parents pursuing a college degree and kept tuition from rising in our UC and CSU systems.

“We have helped defend our state from Trump’s attacks – blocking the Administration from using state lands to open up drilling on protected federal lands. We took on the long-standing challenge of clean drinking water systems, became the first ever to require SMOG tests for semi trucks and convinced four major auto-makers to stand up for higher emission standards and oppose the Trump administration.

“California is once again striking out against injustice and leading the nation by example. We passed one of the country’s strongest police use-of-force laws, and outlawed private, for-profit prisons. California became the first state in the nation to stand up to the NCAA’s long-standing profiteering from student athletes. California took first-in-the-nation steps to strengthen our gun safety laws, protect workers and defend reproductive health care rights. We continued to make progress reforming our criminal justice system – eliminating a major mandatory minimum sentence and establishing a system to seal arrest and conviction records for low-level offenses.

“We are proving that our state is successful not despite our diversity, but because of it. California isn’t just defending our vibrant immigrant communities. We are affording all Californians – regardless of immigration status – the chance to serve their communities and give back.

“In California, we are putting in place new reforms of agencies that don’t serve the public as well as they should – pushing the DMV to join the 21st century, giving new authority to the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) to enforce wildfire safety standards, and recasting the priorities of our state’s agency that regulates oil and gas extraction.

“California did all of this while living within our means: creating the largest rainy day fund in California history, paying down pension liabilities and eliminating our state’s wall of debt.  

“In my inaugural, I spoke of the California Dream as a house – one that must be built on a strong fiscal foundation. For that reason, I am returning a number of bills to the Legislature without my signature that would significantly increase costs outside of the state’s regular budget process. 

“We have clearly achieved a great deal together, and I commend the Legislature for their hard work. I look forward to our continued partnership as we head into the new year and continue to tackle challenges of affordability and work to expand opportunity to all Californians.”

In his final action of the 2019 legislative season, the Governor today vetoed a number of bills that would significantly increase costs outside of the state’s regular budget process. In total, Governor Newsom vetoed bills this year costing $1.2 billion, increasing to $3 billion ​annually at full implementation. He also took action on a number of other bills.

FIRST ONSITE PEER ACTION LEAGUE MEMBERS (PALMs) REGIONAL FORUM

Monday, September 16th, 10:00 AM – 3:30 PM
(9:30-10:00 sign in & networking)
San Mateo County

  • Connect & Network
  • Build CApacity
  • Reach & Reflect Diversity
  • Strategic Collective Action

REGISTER HERE
Limited Seats — Lunch Provided

KEYNOTES PANEL: The Peer Story in California

CONSTITUENCY PERSPECTIVES PANEL: Youth, Adult, Family of Adult, Parent, Cultural

GROWING PEER SUPPORT IN THE GREATER BAY AREA REGION

COLLABORATIVE GROUP ACTION PLANNING

Who should attendCounty BH Directors, Family, Peers & Peer Run Programs of the Greater Bay Area Regional Counties (Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Monterey, Napa, San Benito, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Solano & Sonoma) Open to all others.

*If you want to become a Peer Action League Member, please go to:https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/INDIVIDUAL-PAL-APP

OR

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PEER-RUN-PAL-APP

***Advance Notice for translation, interpretation or for accommodations will be honored*** Please contact Karin at klettau7@gmail.com to confirm.

 

Presented by the California Association of Mental Health Peer Run Organizations (CAMHPRO) in partnership and collaboration with Heart & Soul, Inc.
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CAMHPRO Seeks Talented, Diverse Peers for Part-Time Positions

#1 Qualification: To be a person with personal lived experience of behavioral health (mental health &/or substance use/abuse) challenges in recovery

  • The positions are very part-time, at 5 hours per week, and are independent contractor positions, paying $20/hour.
  • Cover letter and resumes accepted by Executive Director, Sally Zinman, at sallyzinman@gmail.com until May 30, 2019 at 11:59 pm.
  • Positions will begin no later than the end of June, 2019.
If you are interested in applying, please review the Job Descriptions and Qualification by clicking on the Job Title below

Outreach Administrative Apprentice 
The Outreach Administrative Apprentice is primarily responsible for assisting with outreach to engage diverse groups and individuals in Peer Action League activities, and general administrative support.

Cultural Diversity Coordinator
The Cultural Diversity Coordinator is primarily responsible for managing activities of CAMHPRO’s Peer Action League (PAL) Cultural Racial Ethnic Equity Committee and administrative support to PAL

Public Policy Coordinator

The Public Policy Coordinator is primarily responsible for managing activities of CAMHPRO’s Peer Action League (PAL) Public Policy Committee and administrative support to PAL.

BRSS TACS April 2019 Monthly Update

Welcome to the April 2019 Monthly Update from SAMHSA’s Bringing Recovery Supports to Scale Technical Assistance Center Strategy (BRSS TACS). BRSS TACS Monthly Updates highlight upcoming events and resources that promote recovery.
In This Issue:
  • Recovery LIVE! Virtual Event: “Increasing Access to Treatment and Recovery Supports for People with Disabilities”– April 25, 2019
  • Ask the Expert
  • Funding Opportunity from the Health Resources & Services Administration
  • Now Available: Two New Resources from the National Alliance for Recovery Residences
  • Patient Scholarship Opportunity: AcademyHealth Annual Research Meeting
  • Two-part Webinar: “De-escalating the Opioid Crisis: An Overview of Promising Prevention Strategies” – April 23–24, 2019
  • Just Released: After a School Tragedy…Readiness, Response, Recovery, & Resources
  • Webinar: “Medication-Assisted Treatment in the Health Care for the Homeless Community: Strategies for Expanding Services” – May 1, 2019
  • Recommended Recovery Resources
  • Request Technical Assistance



Ask the Expert

Nev Jones, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Mental Health Law & Policy at the University of South Florida, shares ways to support college students with mental health issues.
Question: 
What can we do to improve college access and success for young people with mental health issues?
Answer
Young people with mental health issues face numerous barriers in completing a college education. There are two key strategies for improving access: better use of academic accommodations and advocacy for improved supports on campus.

In theory, academic accommodations—disability-based administrative policy and course modifications—are one of the most powerful tools we have for leveling the playing field for students with disabilities. Unfortunately, many campus disability offices lack expertise in psychiatric disabilities and may hand out lists of stock accommodations that would do little to address challenges specific to mental health. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that accommodations be carefully tailored to meet individual needs. Greater awareness of the types of accommodations for mental health conditions is critical. The resources listed below can help students and instructors develop accommodation plans that are much more likely to address complex mental health needs.

While we regularly hear about students placed on mandated leaves of absence, some campuses have taken a much more compassionate approach. For example, some campuses provide wraparound case management designed to help students connect the dots across otherwise siloed university divisions. At other universities, administrators have developed dedicated programs aimed at providing proactive supports to students with significant mental health challenges. Ideally, such supports would be available on every campus. Students, families, and providers can play a major role in expanding such programs by advocating for local funding and implementation.

To learn more, join us at Recovery LIVE!: “Increasing Access to Treatment and Recovery Supports for People with Disabilities” on April 25, 2019, and check out the following resources:

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Movement and Your Mental Health – PEERS

Movement and Your Mental Health
by Leah Harris

Our physical and mental health are deeply intertwined. The state of our mind can affect the health of our bodies. Physical activity has been widely correlated with a reduction in depression and anxiety, which in turn can increase physical well-being, which further improves mental health, and so on. Movement also offers an accessible alternative to persons who cannot afford or access traditional psychotherapy, or who have not found such therapies to be beneficial. And recently, researchers at Yale and Oxford published a study indicating that exercise may be more important to our mental health than economic status!

Images from the We Move for Health, May 3rd, 2019 at San Leandro Marina

This month, we’re taking a deeper look at the relationship between physical activity and our mental health. What kinds of physical activity are best — not just for our bodies, but for our minds? What is the “sweet spot” amount of movement that leads to the greatest mental health benefits? And what are alternative options for persons who cannot perform physical activity due to illness or disability?

A 2018 study in The Lancet found that team sports seemed to offer the greatest overall mental health benefits. The researchers analyzed Centers for Disease Control and Prevention survey data from 1.2 million adults and found — across age, gender, education status and income — people who exercised had fewer “bad mental health days” than those who didn’t. And people who played team sports reported the fewest. The study’s authors hypothesized that team sports may be so beneficial to mental health because they incorporate the added benefit of community and social support. This is especially relevant for people living with depression or other mental health conditions where isolation is common. A related benefit of team sports is built-in accountability. While you can blow off a solo walk in nature, your team is depending on you to win the game. If team sports aren’t for you, research has demonstrated the self-esteem boosting benefits of activities using synchronized group movements, such as Qi Gong or Tai Chi.

While we know that a lack of physical activity can influence the course of our mental health, more movement does not necessarily mean more benefit. A 2018 study published in The Lancet found that those who exercised more than 90 minutes a day, for most days of the month, reported worse mental health than those who moved less. Generally, researchers recommend a rule of thumb of 30-60 minutes a day, 3-5 times a week for optimum well-being.

When discussing the relationship between physical activity and mental health, it’s important to provide accessible alternatives to people with limited mobility due to disability, illness, or aging. A practice with similar physical and mental health benefits to sustained physical activity is simply spending time in nature. Just 30-40 minutes spent sitting quietly or wandering slowly in a green space, breathing mindfully, can improve mood and even immune function, according to research conducted on the Japanese practice of shinrin-yoku or “forest bathing.

Here’s to moving this spring for our mental health.

To learn more, check out these resources!

            PEERS FACEBOOK PAGE                                                 PEERS WEBSITE

Become a Peer Action League Member (PALM)

Do you want to be part of something bigger than yourself?
Become a member of Peer Action League (PAL)

1) Join our Intro to PAL webinar
2) Apply online or by PDF

Register for one of the INTRO TO PAL Webinars:

Two Webinar Dates

Tuesday May 14
12 noon – 1 p.m.

Thursday June 6
12 noon – 1 p.m.

To become a PALM you must agree to abide by
CHAMPRO’s Public Policy Principles

TO APPLY using SurveyMonkey or by downloading the PDF

PALM APPLICATION FOR INDIVIDUAL PEERS

SurveyMonkey Link: Individual Application

PDF Download Individual Peer Application

PALM APPLICATION FOR PEER RUN PROGRAM/AGENCY

Peer Action League Activities

  • Webinars to Optimize Peer Run Agency/Program Infrastructure & Sustainability-Quarterly.
  • Regional Policy Forums:
    • 4 per year
    • culminating with a statewide Conference in Year 3.
  • Advocacy webinar series for effective peer stakeholder voices.
  • Continued monthly peer webinars
    • Peer Best Practices
    • Standardization
    • Peer Support 4 Peer Specialists (PS4PS)
  • Empower peers throughout the State to serve on key State-level policy bodies.
  • 3 PAL Action Committees meet online
    • Peer Workforce
    • Cultural Racial & Ethnic Equity
    • Public Policy
  • PAL Members (PALMs) quarterly meetings online to share progress and outcomes from Action Committees, and to plan collective next steps.

Please pass this on to colleagues, friends and people you serve!

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Resilience Inc. – Rise and Shine News

At Resilience, Inc. we are discovering the next steps toward transformation on the evolutionary ladder of recovery and wellness. The skills and knowledge gained over the past 20 years have allowed the field to make dramatic shifts in the approaches taken to facilitate recovery from emotional distress, addiction and hard times.

The challenge now is to create a new pathway toward resilient community living.  By building on the “Aha!” moment of recovery we can create a lifetime of self-sustaining and resilient living. This is a challenge, but based on the faith it took to believe in the miracle of recovery, we trust the human spirit to be resilient.

Rise and Shine with Us!

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Message From Lori Ashcraft: Newsletter

Hello Friends,

We are certainly getting our share of April showers here in Northern California. Lots of us are tired of the rain, but not me. I love it. But I sympathize with those who complain anyway. Why not? We can’t change it anyway.

Speaking of changing things, last night I was thinking about the phrase that began to change the way we look at case management. “I’m not a case and I don’t want to be managed.” This simple phrase became the battle cry for all those on case management who wanted to be treated differently. They wanted to have a say in their treatment planning. They wanted to be treated with respect. I first heard this phrase in the early 80’s as it fell from the lips of Jay Mahler, a highly respected peer pioneer and advocate in California. Jay played a significant role in bringing into being what’s known as “the millionaire tax” that has enhanced the funding of recovery and peer programs in California.

Many professionals welcomed this shift from “managing” to “inspiring” since they knew managing wasn’t working. Trying to manage and control people did not promote recovery and healing.

I had already learned this from my early work as a care manger and I’ve shared some of those stories with you. I have another one to share this time that was the experience that finally drove this home for me. This one, Debbie’s story, is about a teenager. I think teenagers get listened to less than anyone, and I was no exception when it came to Debbie. I thought I knew what was best for her. In fact, I thought I knew more about everything than she did. Boy, was I off on the wrong foot! Take a look for yourself by going to our website by clicking on this tab Resources. Then, scroll to the bottom of the webpage and click on “Debbie’s Story” (in orange).

I’d like to think things have changed a lot since then, but I still hear awful stories about how Case Management is being carried out in some places. The addition of peers to Case Management Teams has the potential of making significant positive changes if they are given the latitude to influence the process.

Until May flowers,

Lori
XOXOXO