SB 803 PASSED SENATE, now in ASSEMBLY

SB 803 (Beall) – Peer Support Specialist Certification Program  passed the Senate on Special Consent 39 – 0 on Wednesday June 24. The bill is now in the Assembly, and will go to the Assembly Health Committee. 

Write your support letters NOW, if you haven’t already.
Please see attached template Support Letter, CAMHPRO’s Floor Alert, and Senator Beall’s SB 803 Fact Sheet.

Join the Discussion. Monthly Peer Webinars, Updated Links and Previous Recorded Webinars SB 803

Click Here and Sign up for monthly updates

State Peer/Family Certification 2nd Thursday at 12 noon

Please join us each month on the 2nd Thursday, at noon. CAMHPRO is changing the format of this monthly webinar again with a quarterly rotation of a Spotlight with a Guest Presenter of Model Peer Support Practices, Peer Support 4 Peer Supporters with a Guest Co-Facilitator, and Updates on CA Peer Certification.

We will invite other counties/agencies or states to present on their peer specialist service practices to demonstrate what is working and what is possible for the State of California. We will also provide policy updates, progress and funding as they happen regarding national and state peer specialist standardization or certification.

California is the last of a handful of states without a State protocol for certification of peer support specialists!

Join the conversation!

These CAMHPRO webinars are funded by the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) under the State Consumer Network grant.

Click Here and Sign up for monthly updates

After registering once, you will receive a confirmation email each month

Helpful PDF Documents

17 Stakeholder Recommendations Appendix K
California Peer Specialist Timeline 3.21.18
FAQs on CA STATE CERTIFICATION 1.31.18
Senate Health_Bill_Analysis 3.12.18

Tracking The Bill

The FULL TEXT and ongoing status of the CA SB 803 (Beall-D) can be found and tracked at the following website: CA Legislative Information Click on ‘TRACK’, Create account with email and password only to choose to receive notices whenever there is action on the bill, for example it is in read on the CA Senate Floor, in Committee, passed, etc.

Upcoming Webinars

Thu, Jun 11, 2020 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PDT
Thu, Jul 9, 2020 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PDT
Thu, Aug 13, 2020 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PDT
Thu, Sep 10, 2020 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PDT

Previously Recorded Webinars
Click Here

SB 803, Peer Certification, going to Senate Health Committee Wednesday May 13. Still time to write letters

SB 803 Peer Certification
Senate hHealth Committee on Wednesday May 13.
Richard Pan, Chair

CAMHPRO SB 803 Support Letter
Please, use this template and send your own letter!

Information from the California Senate:Health Committee on hearings in today’s coronavirus environment.

Committee Website Teleconference Instructions:

Due to the statewide stay-at-home order and guidance on physical distancing, seating for committee hearings will be very limited for press and for the public. All are encouraged to watch our hearing from its live stream on the Senate’s website at https://www.senate.ca.gov/

We encourage the public to submit written testimony before the hearing through the position letter portal. Please note that any written testimony submitted to the committee is considered public comment and may be read into the record or reprinted.

The Capitol will be open for attendance of committee hearings, but the public is strongly encouraged to participate via the web portal or telephonically.

Information regarding a call-in option for testimony will be made available and updated the night prior to the hearing date.

Please note: In order for your testimony to be heard clearly, you must mute any devices you are using to live stream the committee hearing prior to calling into the teleconference service.

SB 803 (Beall): Mental health services: Peer Support Specialist Certification – SUPPORT

February 19, 2020
The Honorable Jim Beall
California State Senator
California State Capitol, Room 2082
Sacramento, CA 95814

RE: SB 803 (Beall): Mental health services: peer support specialist certification – SUPPORT

Dear Senator Beall: The California Association of Mental Health Peer Run Organizations (CAMHPRO) supports Senate Bill 806, which would establish a statewide certification program for peer support specialists and would provide the structure needed to maximize the federal match for peer services under Medi-Cal. CAMHPRO is proud to be a co-sponsor of SB 803.

CAMHPRO promotes the work and missions of peer-run organizations devoted to advocacy and empowerment for mental health consumers. CAMHPRO’s mission is to transform communities and the behavioral health care system throughout California to empower, support, and ensure the rights of consumers; eliminate stigma, and advance self-determination for all those affected by mental health issues.

In supporting a Peer Support Specialist Certification Program in California, CAMHPRO joins the formidable array of California organizations, counties and individuals advocating for growth in high quality peer/family support services and peer specialist career development. Through support of SB 803, we look to finally bring peer support specialist certification to California.

Programmatically, peer certification makes sense
Numerous research studies support the efficacy and cost effectiveness of peer specialist services. Peer services, as opposed to traditional services alone, lead to less inpatient services, decreased symptoms, increased coping skills and life satisfaction, reduced overall ongoing need for mental health services, and decreased substance use.

Across California, peers are already providing peer support services. However, there is no statewide scope of practice, standardized curriculum, training standards, supervision standards, or certification protocol. Few counties that provide peer support services require training prior to hire. The benefits of Peer Certification for peer support are obvious.

Peer certification:
  • Defines the service of peer support;
  • Provides a standardized scope of practice, values and ethics, and competencies;
  • Assures that practitioners receive standardized training and demonstrate competency;
  • Ensures that service recipients will receive the same quality of services regardless of where in California they live;
  • Provides a basis for the ability to bill Medi-Cal for services provided; and
  • Allows for portability of Certification between counties.
Peer Certification also makes good fiscal sense, and California is one of only two states in the nation without it.

In 2007, the US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) sent a guidance letter to all State Medicaid Directors emphasizing, “peer support services are an evidence-based mental health model of care which consists of a qualified peer support provider who assists individuals with their recovery from mental illness and substance use disorders.” CMS encouraged states to establish a state certification process for training, credentialing, supervision and care coordination. (CMS, SMDL #07-011). This enables the use of federal Medicaid (Medi-Cal in California) financial participation with a 50% match. Currently, 48 states, plus the District of Columbia and the US Department of Veteran’s Affairs, have implemented protocols to certify peer specialists, enabling them to leverage Medicaid funds. However, California has not acted and Californians deserve better!

Initially funded by Department of Mental Health and then Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD), California began an in-depth and focused look at peer certification in 2011.Substantial grassroots work has been done toward peer certification since 2012 and substantial government funds have already been invested into developing peer certification in California.

SB 803 makes sense from both a policy and fiscal perspective and will provide more comprehensive assistance to people in need. CAMHPRO is proud to be part of a statewide movement to bring California up to speed with the rest of the nation in recovery and resiliency services through a state protocol for Medi-CAL billing and certification of peer support specialists.

Sincerely,
Sally Zinman
Executive Director
CAMHPRO
sallyzinman@gmail.com

United States Department of Health & Human Services, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Guidance Letter to State Medicaid Directors, SMDL #07-011, August 15, 2007.

Click to access SMD081507A.pdf

PRESS RELEASE: New Peer Certification Bill SB 803 Introduced

SB 803 (Beall) PRESS RELEASE

Principle author Senator Jim Beall,  Principal Co-author Assemblymember Marie Waldron, Co-authors Senator Wiener and Senator Wilk Assembly members Aguiar-Curry, Arambula Aguiar-Curry, Grayson, Ramos and Wicks  CAMHPRO a co sponsor

SB 803 Fact Sheet

SB 803 Peers Press Release January 8 2020

Senator Jim Beall Champions Mental Health Legislation to Certify Peers

Today, long-time mental health champion Senator Jim Beall introduced legislation SB 803 to create state certification for mental health care providers known as Peer Support Specialists.

Last year, Senator Beall’s bipartisan effort, SB 10, made it to the Governor’s desk with unanimous votes, where it was vetoed. Sen. Beall is reintroducing this legislative initiative as an effort to make strategic, cost-effective reforms to California’s mental health programs.

“Statewide certification of Peer Support Specialists will ultimately save the state money while improving mental health outcomes. The Governor and I have the same goals- help people and use our resources wisely. SB 803 will improve our system in an ongoing, sustainable way.”

A peer is a person who draws on lived experience with mental illness and/or substance use disorder and recovery, bolstered by specialized training, to deliver valuable support services in a mental health and/or substance use setting. “It is time that peers are validated as an essential and professional part of the behavioral health workforce” asserts Sally Zinman, Executive Director of California Association of Mental Health Peer Run Organizations (CAMHPRO).

The state is facing a shortage of qualified mental health professionals to ensure all Californians receive care. Peer Support Specialists are a much needed addition to the workforce.

Dr. Jonathan Sherin, Director of the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, emphasized that LA County is ready to take action. “LA County looks to expand upon and professionalize its peer support programs in a sustainable manner which will not be possible until we secure statewide certification and a reliable reimbursement mechanism. Leveraging lived experience through peer support is critical to the service transformation we need in California. The state must make the most of every resource available to address our mental health crisis; recognizing and resourcing Peer Support Specialists statewide will be a wise investment.”

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and 48 states have a certification process in place or in development for mental health peer support specialists. The federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services released guidance in 2007 for establishing a certification program for peers to enable the use of federal Medicaid (Medi-Cal in California) financial participation with a 50% match.

Studies show that peers contribute to the ability of people with mental illness and substance abuse to obtain education and employment, contributing to the California economy rather than depending on social safety nets alone.

“Research demonstrates that the utilization of qualified peer support specialists has measurable benefits to clients including reduced hospitalizations, improved functioning, and alleviation of depression and other symptoms. The time has come for California to embrace peer support as an evidence-based model and put in place a certification program that will standardize best practices” stated Maggie Merritt, Executive Director of the Steinberg Institute, a Sacramento-based non-profit mental health public policy institute.

In California, demand for peer services is growing, but there is no statewide scope of practice, training standards, supervision standards, or certification.

 “California has an important opportunity to deliver quality, cost-effective, evidence-based mental health services and add diversity to our mental health workforce by certifying Peer Support Specialists,” said Michelle Doty Cabrera, executive director of the County Behavioral Health Directors Association of California (CBHDA).  “While California faces a severe shortage of mental health professionals needed to serve our diverse communities, the specific services delivered by trained, supervised peers have shown to improve client outcomes and reduce costs at the same time.  But California can only realize these benefits for our mental health clients in Medi-Cal if we join the 48 states that have already recognized the effectiveness of Peer Support Services through certification.” 

SB 803, The Peer Support Specialist Certification Act of 2020 establishes a statewide certification program for peer support specialists and provides the structure needed to maximize the federal match for peer services under Medi-Cal.

The legislation is applauded by a broad and large coalition of supporters, and is sponsored by California Association of Mental Health Peer Run Organizations, County Behavioral Health Directors Association of California, County of Los Angeles Board of Supervisors, and Steinberg Institute.

SB 10 Peer Certification VETOED – again

Governor Newsom Takes Final Action of 2019 Legislative Season
Published: 

LINK TO ALL FINAL ACTIONS

OFFICAL SB 10 VETO MESSAGE

*From the website*
Joint accomplishments include urgently addressing California’s affordability crisis by passing the Nation’s strongest statewide rent protections, expanding health care coverage and passing legislation to lower prescription drug prices

Focused on effective government by fortifying state against natural disasters and economic downturns – passing historic wildfire safety legislation and creating largest rainy day fund Ensuring justice for all Californians by passing historic clean drinking water legislation and taking on powerful institutions on behalf of everyday Californians

“Together, we have accomplished a great deal this year to help California families get ahead and made historic progress on some of the state’s most intractable challenges.”

SACRAMENTO — Governor Gavin Newsom took his final actions of the 2019 legislative season today and thanked the Legislature for their work and accomplishment on enacting 870 bills in the following statement:

“I want to take a moment to congratulate the Legislature on their work this year and to thank Senate President pro Tempore Toni Atkins and Speaker of the Assembly Anthony Rendon for their leadership. Together, we have accomplished a great deal this year – through the budget and legislation – that helps California families get ahead and tackles some of the state’s most intractable problems.

“This year, California passed the nation’s strongest renter protection package. Our state made record housing and homeless investments paired with big new tools for housing production. We moved California closer to universal health care coverage by expanding coverage, increasing Covered California subsidies for middle-income Californians and taking on rising prescription drug prices. 

“California, faced with catastrophic wildfires, invested $1 billion to prevent, mitigate and recover from wildfires, disasters and emergencies. And in July, our state enacted something that few people thought could be done – wildfire legislation that moved California closer to a safer, reliable and affordable energy future.

“Our state is doing more now than at any point in our history to help California families tackle the challenges of affordability and provide opportunity to all Californians – more than doubling tax cuts for working families, expanding paid family leave, increasing access to early childhood education, and taking on payday lenders. 

“On education, California brought disparate sides in the education community together and forged a historic agreement on changes to charter school law that was years in the making. We invested more in K-14 education than at any point in our history, and put on next year’s ballot the chance to make long-overdue investments in school infrastructure and safety. California made two years of community college tuition-free, increased financial aid for parents pursuing a college degree and kept tuition from rising in our UC and CSU systems.

“We have helped defend our state from Trump’s attacks – blocking the Administration from using state lands to open up drilling on protected federal lands. We took on the long-standing challenge of clean drinking water systems, became the first ever to require SMOG tests for semi trucks and convinced four major auto-makers to stand up for higher emission standards and oppose the Trump administration.

“California is once again striking out against injustice and leading the nation by example. We passed one of the country’s strongest police use-of-force laws, and outlawed private, for-profit prisons. California became the first state in the nation to stand up to the NCAA’s long-standing profiteering from student athletes. California took first-in-the-nation steps to strengthen our gun safety laws, protect workers and defend reproductive health care rights. We continued to make progress reforming our criminal justice system – eliminating a major mandatory minimum sentence and establishing a system to seal arrest and conviction records for low-level offenses.

“We are proving that our state is successful not despite our diversity, but because of it. California isn’t just defending our vibrant immigrant communities. We are affording all Californians – regardless of immigration status – the chance to serve their communities and give back.

“In California, we are putting in place new reforms of agencies that don’t serve the public as well as they should – pushing the DMV to join the 21st century, giving new authority to the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) to enforce wildfire safety standards, and recasting the priorities of our state’s agency that regulates oil and gas extraction.

“California did all of this while living within our means: creating the largest rainy day fund in California history, paying down pension liabilities and eliminating our state’s wall of debt.  

“In my inaugural, I spoke of the California Dream as a house – one that must be built on a strong fiscal foundation. For that reason, I am returning a number of bills to the Legislature without my signature that would significantly increase costs outside of the state’s regular budget process. 

“We have clearly achieved a great deal together, and I commend the Legislature for their hard work. I look forward to our continued partnership as we head into the new year and continue to tackle challenges of affordability and work to expand opportunity to all Californians.”

In his final action of the 2019 legislative season, the Governor today vetoed a number of bills that would significantly increase costs outside of the state’s regular budget process. In total, Governor Newsom vetoed bills this year costing $1.2 billion, increasing to $3 billion ​annually at full implementation. He also took action on a number of other bills.

FIRST ONSITE PEER ACTION LEAGUE MEMBERS (PALMs) REGIONAL FORUM

Monday, September 16th, 10:00 AM – 3:30 PM
(9:30-10:00 sign in & networking)
San Mateo County

  • Connect & Network
  • Build CApacity
  • Reach & Reflect Diversity
  • Strategic Collective Action

REGISTER HERE
Limited Seats — Lunch Provided

KEYNOTES PANEL: The Peer Story in California

CONSTITUENCY PERSPECTIVES PANEL: Youth, Adult, Family of Adult, Parent, Cultural

GROWING PEER SUPPORT IN THE GREATER BAY AREA REGION

COLLABORATIVE GROUP ACTION PLANNING

Who should attendCounty BH Directors, Family, Peers & Peer Run Programs of the Greater Bay Area Regional Counties (Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Monterey, Napa, San Benito, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Solano & Sonoma) Open to all others.

*If you want to become a Peer Action League Member, please go to:https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/INDIVIDUAL-PAL-APP

OR

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PEER-RUN-PAL-APP

***Advance Notice for translation, interpretation or for accommodations will be honored*** Please contact Karin at klettau7@gmail.com to confirm.

 

Presented by the California Association of Mental Health Peer Run Organizations (CAMHPRO) in partnership and collaboration with Heart & Soul, Inc.
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CAMHPRO Seeks Talented, Diverse Peers for Part-Time Positions

#1 Qualification: To be a person with personal lived experience of behavioral health (mental health &/or substance use/abuse) challenges in recovery

  • The positions are very part-time, at 5 hours per week, and are independent contractor positions, paying $20/hour.
  • Cover letter and resumes accepted by Executive Director, Sally Zinman, at sallyzinman@gmail.com until May 30, 2019 at 11:59 pm.
  • Positions will begin no later than the end of June, 2019.
If you are interested in applying, please review the Job Descriptions and Qualification by clicking on the Job Title below

Outreach Administrative Apprentice 
The Outreach Administrative Apprentice is primarily responsible for assisting with outreach to engage diverse groups and individuals in Peer Action League activities, and general administrative support.

Cultural Diversity Coordinator
The Cultural Diversity Coordinator is primarily responsible for managing activities of CAMHPRO’s Peer Action League (PAL) Cultural Racial Ethnic Equity Committee and administrative support to PAL

Public Policy Coordinator

The Public Policy Coordinator is primarily responsible for managing activities of CAMHPRO’s Peer Action League (PAL) Public Policy Committee and administrative support to PAL.

BRSS TACS April 2019 Monthly Update

Welcome to the April 2019 Monthly Update from SAMHSA’s Bringing Recovery Supports to Scale Technical Assistance Center Strategy (BRSS TACS). BRSS TACS Monthly Updates highlight upcoming events and resources that promote recovery.
In This Issue:
  • Recovery LIVE! Virtual Event: “Increasing Access to Treatment and Recovery Supports for People with Disabilities”– April 25, 2019
  • Ask the Expert
  • Funding Opportunity from the Health Resources & Services Administration
  • Now Available: Two New Resources from the National Alliance for Recovery Residences
  • Patient Scholarship Opportunity: AcademyHealth Annual Research Meeting
  • Two-part Webinar: “De-escalating the Opioid Crisis: An Overview of Promising Prevention Strategies” – April 23–24, 2019
  • Just Released: After a School Tragedy…Readiness, Response, Recovery, & Resources
  • Webinar: “Medication-Assisted Treatment in the Health Care for the Homeless Community: Strategies for Expanding Services” – May 1, 2019
  • Recommended Recovery Resources
  • Request Technical Assistance



Ask the Expert

Nev Jones, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Mental Health Law & Policy at the University of South Florida, shares ways to support college students with mental health issues.
Question: 
What can we do to improve college access and success for young people with mental health issues?
Answer
Young people with mental health issues face numerous barriers in completing a college education. There are two key strategies for improving access: better use of academic accommodations and advocacy for improved supports on campus.

In theory, academic accommodations—disability-based administrative policy and course modifications—are one of the most powerful tools we have for leveling the playing field for students with disabilities. Unfortunately, many campus disability offices lack expertise in psychiatric disabilities and may hand out lists of stock accommodations that would do little to address challenges specific to mental health. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that accommodations be carefully tailored to meet individual needs. Greater awareness of the types of accommodations for mental health conditions is critical. The resources listed below can help students and instructors develop accommodation plans that are much more likely to address complex mental health needs.

While we regularly hear about students placed on mandated leaves of absence, some campuses have taken a much more compassionate approach. For example, some campuses provide wraparound case management designed to help students connect the dots across otherwise siloed university divisions. At other universities, administrators have developed dedicated programs aimed at providing proactive supports to students with significant mental health challenges. Ideally, such supports would be available on every campus. Students, families, and providers can play a major role in expanding such programs by advocating for local funding and implementation.

To learn more, join us at Recovery LIVE!: “Increasing Access to Treatment and Recovery Supports for People with Disabilities” on April 25, 2019, and check out the following resources:

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Movement and Your Mental Health – PEERS

Movement and Your Mental Health
by Leah Harris

Our physical and mental health are deeply intertwined. The state of our mind can affect the health of our bodies. Physical activity has been widely correlated with a reduction in depression and anxiety, which in turn can increase physical well-being, which further improves mental health, and so on. Movement also offers an accessible alternative to persons who cannot afford or access traditional psychotherapy, or who have not found such therapies to be beneficial. And recently, researchers at Yale and Oxford published a study indicating that exercise may be more important to our mental health than economic status!

Images from the We Move for Health, May 3rd, 2019 at San Leandro Marina

This month, we’re taking a deeper look at the relationship between physical activity and our mental health. What kinds of physical activity are best — not just for our bodies, but for our minds? What is the “sweet spot” amount of movement that leads to the greatest mental health benefits? And what are alternative options for persons who cannot perform physical activity due to illness or disability?

A 2018 study in The Lancet found that team sports seemed to offer the greatest overall mental health benefits. The researchers analyzed Centers for Disease Control and Prevention survey data from 1.2 million adults and found — across age, gender, education status and income — people who exercised had fewer “bad mental health days” than those who didn’t. And people who played team sports reported the fewest. The study’s authors hypothesized that team sports may be so beneficial to mental health because they incorporate the added benefit of community and social support. This is especially relevant for people living with depression or other mental health conditions where isolation is common. A related benefit of team sports is built-in accountability. While you can blow off a solo walk in nature, your team is depending on you to win the game. If team sports aren’t for you, research has demonstrated the self-esteem boosting benefits of activities using synchronized group movements, such as Qi Gong or Tai Chi.

While we know that a lack of physical activity can influence the course of our mental health, more movement does not necessarily mean more benefit. A 2018 study published in The Lancet found that those who exercised more than 90 minutes a day, for most days of the month, reported worse mental health than those who moved less. Generally, researchers recommend a rule of thumb of 30-60 minutes a day, 3-5 times a week for optimum well-being.

When discussing the relationship between physical activity and mental health, it’s important to provide accessible alternatives to people with limited mobility due to disability, illness, or aging. A practice with similar physical and mental health benefits to sustained physical activity is simply spending time in nature. Just 30-40 minutes spent sitting quietly or wandering slowly in a green space, breathing mindfully, can improve mood and even immune function, according to research conducted on the Japanese practice of shinrin-yoku or “forest bathing.

Here’s to moving this spring for our mental health.

To learn more, check out these resources!

            PEERS FACEBOOK PAGE                                                 PEERS WEBSITE