SB 10 Peer Certification VETOED – again

Governor Newsom Takes Final Action of 2019 Legislative Season
Published: 

LINK TO ALL FINAL ACTIONS

OFFICAL SB 10 VETO MESSAGE

*From the website*
Joint accomplishments include urgently addressing California’s affordability crisis by passing the Nation’s strongest statewide rent protections, expanding health care coverage and passing legislation to lower prescription drug prices

Focused on effective government by fortifying state against natural disasters and economic downturns – passing historic wildfire safety legislation and creating largest rainy day fund Ensuring justice for all Californians by passing historic clean drinking water legislation and taking on powerful institutions on behalf of everyday Californians

“Together, we have accomplished a great deal this year to help California families get ahead and made historic progress on some of the state’s most intractable challenges.”

SACRAMENTO — Governor Gavin Newsom took his final actions of the 2019 legislative season today and thanked the Legislature for their work and accomplishment on enacting 870 bills in the following statement:

“I want to take a moment to congratulate the Legislature on their work this year and to thank Senate President pro Tempore Toni Atkins and Speaker of the Assembly Anthony Rendon for their leadership. Together, we have accomplished a great deal this year – through the budget and legislation – that helps California families get ahead and tackles some of the state’s most intractable problems.

“This year, California passed the nation’s strongest renter protection package. Our state made record housing and homeless investments paired with big new tools for housing production. We moved California closer to universal health care coverage by expanding coverage, increasing Covered California subsidies for middle-income Californians and taking on rising prescription drug prices. 

“California, faced with catastrophic wildfires, invested $1 billion to prevent, mitigate and recover from wildfires, disasters and emergencies. And in July, our state enacted something that few people thought could be done – wildfire legislation that moved California closer to a safer, reliable and affordable energy future.

“Our state is doing more now than at any point in our history to help California families tackle the challenges of affordability and provide opportunity to all Californians – more than doubling tax cuts for working families, expanding paid family leave, increasing access to early childhood education, and taking on payday lenders. 

“On education, California brought disparate sides in the education community together and forged a historic agreement on changes to charter school law that was years in the making. We invested more in K-14 education than at any point in our history, and put on next year’s ballot the chance to make long-overdue investments in school infrastructure and safety. California made two years of community college tuition-free, increased financial aid for parents pursuing a college degree and kept tuition from rising in our UC and CSU systems.

“We have helped defend our state from Trump’s attacks – blocking the Administration from using state lands to open up drilling on protected federal lands. We took on the long-standing challenge of clean drinking water systems, became the first ever to require SMOG tests for semi trucks and convinced four major auto-makers to stand up for higher emission standards and oppose the Trump administration.

“California is once again striking out against injustice and leading the nation by example. We passed one of the country’s strongest police use-of-force laws, and outlawed private, for-profit prisons. California became the first state in the nation to stand up to the NCAA’s long-standing profiteering from student athletes. California took first-in-the-nation steps to strengthen our gun safety laws, protect workers and defend reproductive health care rights. We continued to make progress reforming our criminal justice system – eliminating a major mandatory minimum sentence and establishing a system to seal arrest and conviction records for low-level offenses.

“We are proving that our state is successful not despite our diversity, but because of it. California isn’t just defending our vibrant immigrant communities. We are affording all Californians – regardless of immigration status – the chance to serve their communities and give back.

“In California, we are putting in place new reforms of agencies that don’t serve the public as well as they should – pushing the DMV to join the 21st century, giving new authority to the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) to enforce wildfire safety standards, and recasting the priorities of our state’s agency that regulates oil and gas extraction.

“California did all of this while living within our means: creating the largest rainy day fund in California history, paying down pension liabilities and eliminating our state’s wall of debt.  

“In my inaugural, I spoke of the California Dream as a house – one that must be built on a strong fiscal foundation. For that reason, I am returning a number of bills to the Legislature without my signature that would significantly increase costs outside of the state’s regular budget process. 

“We have clearly achieved a great deal together, and I commend the Legislature for their hard work. I look forward to our continued partnership as we head into the new year and continue to tackle challenges of affordability and work to expand opportunity to all Californians.”

In his final action of the 2019 legislative season, the Governor today vetoed a number of bills that would significantly increase costs outside of the state’s regular budget process. In total, Governor Newsom vetoed bills this year costing $1.2 billion, increasing to $3 billion ​annually at full implementation. He also took action on a number of other bills.

SB10 Peer Certification Assembly Health Committee 1:30 room 4202

July 2 at 1:30 pm
1315 10th St
Room 4202
Sacramento, CA 95814

 

THIRD READING HISTORY
SENATE RULES COMMITTEE:
Office of Senate Floor Analyses (916) 651-1520
Fax: (916) 327-4478

Bill No: SB 10
Author: Beall (D), et al.
Amended: 5/17/19
Vote: 21

SENATE HEALTH COMMITTEE: 9-0, 3/27/19 AYES: Pan, Stone, Durazo, Grove, Hurtado, Leyva, Mitchell, Monning, Rubio

SENATE APPROPRIATIONS COMMITTEE: 6-0, 5/16/19 AYES: Portantino, Bates, Bradford, Hill, Jones, Wieckowski

SUBJECT: Mental health services: peer support specialist certification

SOURCE: Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors  ~ Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission ~ Steinberg Institute

Message from Senator Beall’s Office

Dear supporters,

Thank you so much for your patience- we have a new Assembly Health committee date for SB 10- Tuesday July 2 at 1:30 pm in room 4202. We will be up first. Please come and show your support- this will be our last policy committee hearing and we want it to be big!

Thank you to all who have sent letters!

Hot Off the Press: SB 10 Peer Certification First Hearing 3/27

The first Hearing date for SB 10, Peer, Parent, Transition-Age, and Family Support Specialist Certification Program, has been set. 
Wednesday March 27
1:30 p.m.
Senate Health Committee Room 4203
Support letters are due a week before the hearing, so by 3/20

Peer Certification is Back! SB 10!

Senator Beall has reintroduced SB 10, mental health  services: peer, parent, transition age, and family support specialist certification

See News Release from Senator Beall’s office:

Legislators Call for Urgent Action to Improve Mental Health Services and Delivery
December 03, 2018

SACRAMENTO — On the opening day of a new legislative session, lawmakers from the Senate and Assembly gathered to call for action to stem California’s mental health crisis.

“It’s no secret that access to integrated mental health services and provider shortages plague our state, resulting in deteriorated mental health outcomes for all Californians,’’ said Beall, chairman of both the Senate Mental Health Caucus and the Select Committee on Mental Health. “The lack of integrated, accessible mental health services is one of the greatest humanitarian challenges we face and we must invest in mental health infrastructure to save many, many lives.

“Early access to treatment is key. Three-quarters of all mental health issues have their onset by the age of 24. Yet adolescents and young adults are the group least likely to receive mental health care. State Auditor Elaine Howle identified that counties have millions of dollars in unspent mental health funds and the state is projecting now a massive budget surplus. With resources available and the need for comprehensive mental health so great, the time for legislation and legislators to act is now.’’

“Joining Beall were John Moorlach (R-Costa Mesa), and Assemblymembers Dr. Joaquin Arambula (D-Fresno), Kansen Chu (D-San Jose) and representatives from the Steinberg Institute, Mental Health America of California and the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

This morning, Beall introduced three bills to increase and ensure mental health services and treatment:

SB 10 increases the effectiveness of mental health and addiction supportive services by establishing a state certification process for peer providers — people with lived experiences as family members, clients, or caretakers of individuals recovering from addiction or mental illness – who guide and help their clients.

SB 11 strengthens enforcement of state and federal mental health parity laws by requiring health care service plans and health insurers to submit annual reports to the state to determine if they are complying with parity laws. The information would be available to the public on the website of either the Department Of Managed Health Care or the Department of Insurance.

SB 12 declares the intent of the Legislature to amend the existing Mental Health Services Act (Proposition 63) to authorize the state and local governments to establish at least 100 drop-in centers to meet youths’ needs. They would be modeled after the headspace project, an Australian national network comprised of “one-shop stop’’ centers for youth to ensure they have the coping skills and a support system in place for a successful transition to adulthood. In California, 17 percent of high school students reported they have seriously considered attempting suicide; 9 percent reported they have attempted suicide one or more times.

The need for mental health treatment, therapy, and counseling is high in California. Only three out of four Californians who have mental health needs receive treatment.

The legislators made clear that California must eliminate gaps in the delivery of mental health services.

Sen. Moorlach called for connecting mental health services to young people. “I think with the Mental Health Services Act and all the funding that’s available, redirecting, giving more focus, and getting things moving is so critical. We can’t have $2.5 billion sitting in bank accounts languishing when we have so many families in need,’’ he said.

Arambula said, “Our foster kids who are exposed to more trauma than most should not have to deal with the crisis of the moment by being penalized and being sent to a judicial system that is not ready to process them. Instead, we should be meeting them where they are at by providing wrap-around services, a social worker and a crisis line.’’

Chu said he supports having at least one mental health professional on school campuses. “I believe the most central location to provide wrap-around services is at the school,’’ he said.